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HE ANNUAL 
PUBLICATION OF 
THE STUDENTS 
OF HOIU/IRD 
COLLEGE AT 
BIRMINGHAM 
ALABAMA 




rCEEWCED 




N CONCEIVING THE IDEA 
OF BUILDING THIS ISSUE OF 
THE ENTRE NOUS AROUND 
BIRMINGHAM AS A THEME, 
THE STAFF HAS DEPARTED 
FROM PRECEDENT. IN DO- 
ING SO, WE HOPE YOU 
WILL GAIN A NEW CONCEP- 
TION OF THE WORD "COM- 
MUNITy"— OF THOUGHT, OF 
SPIRIT, OF ACTION. 



CONTENTS 



EDUCATION 

SPORTS 
INDUSTRY 

. GREEKS • 

BEAUTY 
FINANCE 




CUC NEW 





WRBffi 



■ 



PPESIDENT 



DR. THOMAS V.NEAL 



TO YOU, AS INCOMING PRESI- 
DENT, WE WISH TO EXTEND 
A HEARTY WELCOME, . 
. AND TO ASSURE YOU OF 
OUR EARNEST SUPPORT 
AND CO-OPERATION. MAY 
THIS ADMINISTRATION ADD TO 
THE ACHIEVEMENTS ALREADY 
CREDITED TO YOU, • . AND 
MAY YOU FURTHER RIPEN THE 
INSTITUTION'S HERITAGE. 
TO YOU, DR. NEAL,WE SAY- 
HAPPINESS AND SUCCESS. 









TO BIRMINGHAM, Colossal city of education and ni 
icate this issue of Entre Nous. But sixty years old, rn 
United States, mighty in its fund of natural resources d 
For the future and its promising fortune, we paint th« eg 
« « « « tomorrow might further irrr nl 








erprise, beauty and basic industry, we respectfully ded- 
riingham stands today as the largest city of its age in the 
sparkling with the glorious vigor of youth and ambition, 
iiend of the Birmingham of today, that the Birmingham of 

: its picture upon our minds. » » 



» 



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¥ heophilus It* Eagles 

To Theophilus Randolph Eagles, each student of Howard 
College desires to express his appreciation for an adminis- 
tration which inculcates within the lives of the students an 
understanding of the finest phases of campus life. » » 

His experience, gathered from his student days through 
these days of beneficial service, serve as a criterion for the 
earnest seeker of knowledge. His understanding of human 
nature makes him a friend with whom no student would feel 
the slightest inclination to be ill at ease. Knowing that we 
cannot repay in full this debt of service, we sincerely hope 
that this acknowledgment of our esteem will make known our 
appreciation. »»»»»»»» 





Louis 1W« Lohr 

To Professor Louis W. Lohr, instructor in the department 
of Business Administration and Advisor to the Howard Col- 
lege publications, the Entre Nous offers appreciation for his 
untiring interest and co-operation. » » » » 

In his capacity as advisor, the student publications have 
always found in him an ever-ready friend, willing to advise, 
assist and co-operate in solving their problems. For years 
he has given many hours in service and devotion in the per- 
formance of this duty and it is for this able guidance that the 
students honor, respect and esteem him. » » » 



f& 




'Vmmsm. 



• 



f ¥ C U 1 ¥ ¥ 



Hul-Cee M. Acton, PhcD. 

Professor of Romance Languages 

Richard L. Alexander, A.M. 

Instructor in History 

Paul D. Bales, A.M. 

Instructor in Physics 

William H. Bancroft, A.B. 

Instructor in Athletics 

Ora D. Bohannon, A.B. 

Instructor in Modern Languages 

William E. Bohannon, A.M. 

Professor of Education 

J as. Luther Brakefield, A.M., Ph.D. 

Head of Department of Biology and Pharmacy 

Emily Cate, A.M. 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Oscar S. Causey, A.B., A.M. 

Registrar 

James H. Chapman, A.M., Th.M. 

Professor of Religious Education 

L. O. Dawson, A.B., D.D. 

Professor of Bible and Church History 

Paul de Launay, A.B., Lie. Mis., 
Doc. Mis. 

Professor of French and Director of Music 

Wilbur Eaton, LL.B. 

Instructor in Athletics 

James K. Greer, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Head of History Department 





■■. . 






H ( IJ I I I 



Annabel Hendon 

Secretary to the President 

George W. Hess, A.M., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Percy P. Burns, A.M., Litt.D. 

Dean of College; Professor of English 

Vernon Mangln, A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of Secondary Education 

Addilee Mattison, A.B. 

Secretary to Dean of Education 

L. P. McLane, A.B. 
Head Football Coach 

Hulda McNeel, A.B. 

Instructor in Mathematics 

J. F. Rothermel, A.B., A.M. 
Instructor in Journalism 

John R. Sampey, Jr., S.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 

Lottie Johnson Thomas 
Assistant Treasurer 

William N. Thomas, A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of Ancient Languages 

Thera Mae Towery, M.S. 
Instructor in Biology 

Thomas W. Wood, A.M. 

Instructor in Business Administration 

John Xan, M.S., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 



Jn Ulrouirtam 



Sr. Gkornr H. iiaron 

1861-1931 

(UlaiuV Allison iarnmt 

1905-1930 

Uames itflynn 

1910-1931 

A. S. lKw>tt 

1306-1931 

Htlliam IE. Unggtns 

1909-1932 



"Ann in tl|f anonifB of iientif. 
Sir attll thy lnuimj eon." 



I 







I 




The foundation of every city 
is the education of its youth/ 7 



E D U C AXIOM 






Top row: Barton. Ward. Mosley 
Second row: Gammill, Carr, Blair, Sisson 



John Ross Barton President 

Wallace Ward Vice-President 

Frances Mosley Secretary 

Elsie Gammill Treasurer 

Frances Blair Prophet 

Braxton B. Carr Historian 

Sylvia Sisson Poet 

1 




SENIOR Cl/1** 



THE SENIOR CLASS 




Edith Ansley, A.B. 

<1> M 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

President Freshman Commission (i); Allied Arts 
Club (i, 2, 3, 4); Honor Roll (1); Treasurer 
Junior Class (3); Women's Pan-Hellenic Council 
(3, 4), Secretary (4); Glee Club (3); Hypatia 
(4) ; Secretary Student Body (4) ; Entre Nous 
Staff (3). 



Pauline Band, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Allied Arts Club (3, 4) ; W. A. A. (3, 4); Book 
Lovers' Club (3, 4); Hypatia (4). 






Joe Bandcroft, A.B. 



BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Alphonso Sledge Barger, B.S. 

n k a 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Football (1); Track (2); Y. M. C. A. (3, 4) 
Business Manager Entre Nous (4). 



PAGE EIGHTEEN 



THE SENIOR CLASS 



John Ross Barton, B.S. 

e k n 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

President Senior Class (4) ; Extre Nous Staff (4) ; 
V. M. C. A. (4) ; Band (i, 2) ; Glee Club (1, 2) ; 
Tennis Team (2, 3, 4); Parade Committee (3, 4). 



Zou Steele Bass, A.B. 

a z, :: :: k 

MERIDIAN", MISSISSIPPI 

Washington University (1); Baylor College (2); 
Allied Arts Club, Art Chairman (3); Girls' Glee 
Club (3); Parade Committee (3); Decoration 
Chairman (4); Sigma Sigma Kappa (3, 4), Vice- 
President (4); W. A. A. (3, 4); General Chair- 
man (3), President (4); Senior Ring Committee 
(4); Y. W. C. A. (3, 4). 



Robert C. Berry, B.S. 

X N 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Frances Marguerite Blair, A.B. 

a a n, n k e 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Allied Arts Club (2, 3), Vice-President (3); Girls' 
Glee Club (2, 3); Junior Music Study Club (3); 
Crimson Staff (2); Entre Nous Staff (3); Y. W. 
C. A. (2); Book Lovers' Club (2, 3); "The New- 
Co-ed" (2) ; Who's Who, Popular Girl (2) ; Senior 
Class Prophet (3). 







f m ^ I 



PAGE NINETEEN 



THE SENIGB CLASS 





Thomas E. Bondurant, B.S. 

X X 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

President Student Body (4) ; Football (1, 2, 3, 4) ; 
Basketball (1, 2, 3, 4), Co-Captain (4); Baseball 
(1, 2, 3, 4) ; H Club (2, 3, 4), Vice-President (3) ; 
Winner of Porter Cup (4) ; Winner Andy Jaffe 
Trophy (4) ; Who's Who, Best All-round Ath- 
lete (4). 



Guy Carmichael, B.S. 

e k x 

ENTERPRISE, ALABAMA 

Student Council (1); Football (1, 2, 3, 4), Alter- 
nate Captain (4) ; H Club (2, 3, 4). 



Braxton B. Carr, A.B. 



n k e 



ENTERPRISE, ALABAMA 



Crimson Staff (1, 2, 3, 4), Assistant Editor (2, 3, 
4); Allied Arts Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Entre Nous 
Staff (2, 3) ; Sigma Upsilon (2, 3) ; Who's Who 
(2); Quill Staff (2, 3); Pi Kappa Theta (2, 3), 
Vice-President (3); Varsity Debating Team (1, 2, 
3) ; Delta Kappa (4). 



Dan Carroll, B.S. 

WOODSTOCK, ALABAMA 

Manager Baseball (3, 4); Manager Football (3, 
4) ; Crimson Staff (4). 



PAGE TWENTY 



THE SENIOR CLASS 



Walter Casey, B.S. 

n k <i> 

CULLMAN, ALABAMA 



Richard Jerome Ceraso, A.B. 
x z t 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 

Crimson Staff (4). 



Mary Frank Chapple, A.B. 

A Z, 1 1 K 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Honor Roll (2) ; Entre Nous Staff (3) ; Hypatia 

(4), Monitor (4); Library Student Assistant (2, 3, 

4) ; Book Lovers' Club (3, 4) ; Sigma Sigma Kappa 

Chaplain (4). 



Herman Clark, B.S. 

e k x 

ALEXANDRIA, ALABAMA 

Football (1, 2, 3, 4), Captain (4) ; Basketball (1) 
H Club (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Pan-Hellenic Council (4). 






PAGE TWENTY-ONE 



THE SENIOR CLASS 




James Oscar Colley, A.B. 

x 2 r, k * K 

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA 

Ministerial Association (i, 2, 3, 4) ; B. S. U. Coun- 
cil (2, 3, 4), President (4), Treasurer (3); Repre- 
sentative to Southern B. S. U. Convention, '31 ; Y. 
M. C. A. (2, 3), Treasurer (4) ; Kappa Phi Kappa,' 
Vice-President (4) ; Vice-President Student Body 
( + )• 



Dorothy Lee Craddock, B.S. 

FORT WORTH, TEXAS 

Allied Arts Club (3, 4). 



William Howard Crane, B.S. 

X I r, A E A 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Alpha Epsilon Delta (3, 4), Vice-President (4), 

President (3) ; Biology Laboratory Assistant (3, 4) ; 

Trainer Football Team (4) ; Men's Pan-Hellenic 

Council (3, 4), President (4). 



Maisey Lee Davidson, A.B. 



B <J> A 



BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Entre Nous Staff (1, 4) ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3, 

4) ; Freshman Commission (1) ; Crimson Staff (4) ; 

W. A. A. (3) ; Basketball (2). 



PAGE TWENTY-TWO 



THE SENIOR CLASS 



Burleson Dinsmore, B.S. 



A A 'I', A E A 
DECATUR, ALABAMA 



Leonard Carl Etheredge, A.B. 

TOWN' CREEK, ALABAMA 

Glee Club (i, 2) ; Allied Arts Club (2, 3, 4) ; "Her 

Husband's Wife" (2); "The Importance of Being 

Earnest" (4); Head Cheer Leader (4). 



Virginia Evans, A.B. 

<I> M 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Margaret Fitzpatrick, A.B. 

A Z, B II 6, II K O, A K 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Allied Arts Club (1, 2, 3, 4), Secretary (3), Presi- 
dent (4); Honor Roll (1, 3); V. W. C. A. (1, 2, 
3, 4); President Freshman Commission (1), Treas- 
urer (3); President Beta Pi Theta (3); Crimson 
Staff (3, 4) ; En-tre Nous Staff (4) ; W. A. A. (3, 
4); Riding and Swimming Club (1); College Hu- 
mor "Collegiate Hall of Fame" (2) ; Junior Mar- 
shal (3); Hvpatia (4); Carnival Chairman (3); 
Glee Club (3); Parade Committee (2, 3); Treas- 
urer Junior Class (3); Secretary Sophomore Class 
(2) ; Student Council (4) ; Women's Pan-Hellenic 
Council (4), Vice-President (4) ; Women's Debat- 
ing Council (2), Vice-President (2); Delta Kappa 
(4); Biology Assistant (3); Chairman Student 
Body Programs (4). 





X 





PAGE TWENTY-THREE 



THE SENIOR CLASS 




Chester Foster, A.B. 
z 2 r 

HACKLEBURG, ALABAMA 

Basketball (i, 2, 3, 4), Captain (4); Baseball 
(3, 4)- 



Clifford Foster, B.S. 

x x 

OPP, ALABAMA 

Laziest on the Campus (2, 3, 4) ; Pan-Hellenic 
Council (3, 4); Parade Committee (3, 4). 



Malcolm Fuller, A.B. 

II K H 
NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA 

Ministerial Association (1, 2, 3, 4), Reporter (1), 
Secretary (2), Vice-President (4); B. S. U. Coun- 
cil (2); Winner of Alabama Prize-Essay Contest 
of B. S. V. ; Honor Roll (2, 4) ; Crimson Staff (2, 
4) ; Pi Kappa Theta (4). 



Susie Fuller, A.B. 

a a n 

PERRYVILLE, ALABAMA 

Judson College (1, 2); Freshman Cabinet (1); 
French Club (1, 2); Piano Orchestra (3); Pianist 
Y. W. A. Cabinet (3) ; Junior Representative Dor- 
mitory Council (3), President (4). 



PAGE TWENTY-FOUR 



THE SENIOR CLASS 



Lee Gallman, A.B. 

TUSCALOOSA, ALABAMA 

Ministerial Association (i, 2, 3, 4); Student Mis- 
sion Band (2, 3). 



Elsie Gammill, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Glee Club (3, 4), President (4); Senior Chairman 
Athletics (4); Orchestra (2, 3); Allied Arts Club 
(1, 2, 3); Crimson Staff (2, 3); Treasurer Senior 
Class (4); Basketball Team (2, 3); Tennis Team 
(2, 3) ; Athletic Award (3) ; Book Lovers' Club 
(2, 3) ; Y. W. C. A. (1). 



Emerson Gay, B.S. 



n k * 



SCOTTSB0R0, ALABAMA 



Tennis Team (1, 2, 3, 4); Debating Council (2) ; 
Vice-President Sophomore Class (2) ; Assistant 
Business Manager Extre Nous (2) ; Assistant Bus- 
iness Manager Crimson (4) ; Student Council (4) ; 
Parade Committee (4). 



Dave Gillman, A.B. 



BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 







PAGE TWENTY-FIVE 



THE SENIOR CLASS 






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Naomi Goodwin, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Honor Roll (i, 2) ; Y. W. C. A. (1, 2, 3, 4). 



Lee M. Gourley, B.S. 

i x, n r M 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



James Grant, B.S. 

x 1 r 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Chi Alpha Sigma, Honorary Chemical Fraternity 

(2, 3) ; Assistant in Chemistry (2, 3, 4) ; Pan- 
Hellenic (4). 



Harold Greer, A.B. 

n k * 

EDWARDSVILLE, ALABAMA 



PAGE TWENTY-SIX 



THE SENIOR CLASS 



William Perry Hampton, B.S. 

x s r 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Scientific Society (i, 2, 3, 4); Chi Alpha Sigma, 
Honorary Chemical Fraternity (2, 3, 4). 



Martin Hanners, B.S. 



BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Mary Kathryn Hargrave, A.B. 

* M, X A 'I', II K f> 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Freshman Commission (1); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
(2, 3, 4); Honor Roll (1, 2, 3); Chi Delta Phi, 
Secretary (4) ; W. A. A. (3, 4), Vice-President (3) ; 
Pi Kappa Theta, Secretary (4) ; Hook Lovers' Club, 
Treasurer (3). 



Olive Henkle, A.B. 

A Z 
CRAWFORD, MISSISSIPPI 

Mississippi State College for Women (1, 2, 3); 
West Point Cadets Club (1); Town Girls' Club 
(2, 3) ; Methodist Student League (1, 2, 3) ; Wes- 
ley Foundation Council (1, 3) ; Y. W. C. A. (1, 2, 
3, 4), Sponsor (2, 3) ; W. A. A. ( 1, 2, 3, 4) ; Honor 
Council (1, 2, 3); Hikers' Club (3); Library As- 
sistant (3, 4); Swimmers' Club (3). 




PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN 



THE SENIOR CLASS 




Frances Jackson Hobbs, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Youth Forum (2) ; V. W. C. A. (2) ; Book Lovers' 
Club (4) ; Glee Club (4). 




Herschel Harold Hobbs, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Ministerial Association (1, 2, 3, 4). 





Ruby Shell Holman, A.B. 

BROOKSIDE, ALABAMA 

Piano (3, 4). 



mnaasft / 



Frank Ward James, B.S. 



BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT 



THE SENIOR CLASS 



Julia Elizabeth Kennedy, A.B. 

B * A 
BRL'NDIDGE, ALABAMA 

Troy State Teachers' College (i, 3) ; National Hon- 
orary Society. 



Jacob Sidney Kennemar, B.S. 
x i; r 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Football (1, 2, 3, 4); Baseball (1, 2, 3, 4). 




"*" -JT 



Lincoln E. Knight, B.S. 

X 1 r, A K 

CULLMAN, ALABAMA 

Varsity Debating Team (2, 3, 4) ; Forensic Coun- 
cil (2, 3) ; Inter-Collegiate Debate Council, Presi- 
dent (4) ; Honor Roll (2, 3, 4) ; Chief Marshal 
(3); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (3, 4), Secretary (4); 
Candidate for Degree with Honors. 



Hazel Azelia Kyle, A.B. 

B * A, Z Z K 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

W. A. A., Secretary (3) ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3, 
4); Book Lovers' Club (3, 4), President (3, 4); 
Sigma Sigma Kappa, President (4) ; Pan-Hellenic 
Council (4) ; Secretary of B. S. U. (4) ; Senior 
Basketball Team (4). 




PAGE TWENTY-NINE 



THE SENIOR CLASS 




Nona Leatherwood, A.B. 

a a e 

HOLT, ALABAMA 

University of Alabama (i, 2, 3) ; Glee Club (2, 3, 

4) ; Winner of Atwater Kent Radio Audition (3) ; 

Spanish Club (2, 3) ; Music Study Club (4). 



Harry Lee Levy, B.S. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 
ENTRE Nous Staff (4) ; Crimson Staff (4) 





William V. Long, B.S. 






n k a 






BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 




Basebal 


(1, 2, 3, 4) ; Football (1, 2, 3, 4) 
(2, 3,4)- 


H Club 



Doris May, B.S. 

a a n 

CRERNSBORO, ALABAMA 



PAGE THIRTY 



THE SENIOR CLASS 



Leo R. McCown, A.B. 
x i. r 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Baseball (i, 2) ; Scientific Society (1) ; Allied Arts 
Club (1, 2, 3, 4). 



Henry Howard Meadows, B.S. 

A A T, A E A 
LOWNDESBORO, ALABAMA 

Cheer Leader (3); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (3, 4); 
Pan-Hellenic Council (4) ; Alpha Epsilon Delta, 
President (4); Honor Roll (3); Parade Commit- 
tee (3). 



Virginia Sharples Miller, A.B. 

A A II 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Women's Athletic Association (3, 4), President 

(3); Y. W. C. A. (2, 3, 4); Carnival Chairman 

(3); Pan-Hellenic Council (3, 4), President (4). 



Frances Mosley, A.B. 

A Z, 1 Z K 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Freshman Commission (1); Honor Roll (1, 2); 
Freshman Marshal (1); Sophomore Marshal (2); 
Student Council (3); Allied Arts Club (4) ; Crim- 
son Staff (3, 4) ; Parade Committee (3) ; Secretary 
Senior Class (4). 




PAGE THIRTY-ONE 



THE SENIOR CLASS 




Dorothy Newell., A.B. 

S I X 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Allied Arts Club (2, 3, 4). 



Ray Parks, B.S. 
gen 

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 

Football (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Baseball (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Basket- 
ball (1, 2, 3, 4); Junior Class President (3); H 
Club (1, 2, 3, 4), President (4). 



Claude Hillman Phillips, A.B. 



n k <t> 



VIDALIA, GEORGIA 



Glee Club (2, 3); Glee Club Director (3, 4); Y. 

M. C. A. Cabinet (2, 3) ; Men's Forensic Club 

(3, 4). 



A. PUCCIARELLF, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



PAGE THIRTY-TWO 



1 



THE SENIOR CLASS 



Crawford Reed, A.B. 

b ii e 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Birmingham News Scholarship; Allied Arts Club 

(i, 2, 3, 4) ; Honor Roll (2) ; Orchestra (4) ; Beta 

Pi Theta, President (4) ; Candidate for Degree 

with Honors. 



Omer Lee Reed, A.B. 

2 * E, ST 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

President Freshman Class (1); Entre Nous Staff 
(2) ; Student Council (2, 4) ; Editor of The Quill 
(4) ; Allied Arts Club (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Sigma Upsilon 
(2, 3, 4) ; Glee Club (2) ; Glee Club Orchestra (2). 



Elizabeth Richardson, A.B. 

i 1 x 

FORT PAYNE, ALABAMA 

University of Chattanooga (1); Girls' Dormitory 
Council (3, 4). 



Paul Rosenthal, A.B. 

A E A 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Band Manager (3, 4) ; Drum Major (3, 4) ; Lab- 
oratory Instructor (3, 4); Boilermakers (2, 3); 
Band (1, 2, 3, 4). 







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PAGE THIRTY-THREE 



THE SENIOR CLASS 




Loee Salter, A.B. 

xix, n k e 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2, 3, 4), Reporter (2) ; So- 
cial Chairman (3, 4) ; Parade Committee (3) ; Stu- 
dent Body Program Committee (3); Crimson Staff 
(2, 3, 4), Assistant Business Manager (3, 4) ; Busi- 
ness Manager Junior Edition Crimson (3) ; Pi Kap- 
pa Theta, Honorary Journalistic Fraternity (3, 4); 
Entre Nous Staff (2, 3, 4) ; Assistant Business 
Manager (2), Assistant Editor (3), Editor-in-Chief 
(4) ; Honor Award (4) ; Who's Who, Busiest (4) ; 
Chairman Invitation Committee (4). 



Sylvia Sisson, A.B. 

B <I> A, X A <!>, S 2 K, A K 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Allied Arts Club (1, 2, 3, 4), President (2); "A 
Full House" (1); "Her Husband's Wife" (2); 
"The Charm School" (2); "The New Coed" (3); 
Vice-President Freshman Commission (1); Fresh- 
man Director (2) ; Vice-President Y. W. C. A. (3) ; 
President Y. W. C. A. (4) ; Student Council (2, 3) ; 
Crimson Staff (2); Forensic Council (2); Sigma 
Sigma Kappa, Secretary (4) ; Hvpatia, President 
(4) ; Quill Staff (3, 4)'; W. A. A. (3, 4) ; Junior 
Representative (3); Senior Representative (4); 
Pan-Hellenic (4) ; Parade Committee (3, 4) ; Inter- 
Collegiate Debating Council (4) ; B. S. U. Council 
(4) ; Senior Class Poet (4) ; Dramatic Club Presi- 
dent (2) ; Book Lovers' Club (3, 4). 



Sara Slaughter, A.B. 

A A 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Jeffcohi Club (1); Glee Club (3, 4), Vice-Presi- 
dent (4) ; Junior Music Study Club (4) ; "The 
Charm School"; Beauty Review (4). 



Willie Slaughter, A.B. 

A A e, 2 X K 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Jefferson-Howard Club (1); Glee Club (3, 4); 
Chairman of Business and Finance (4) ; Swimming 
and Riding Club (1); "The Charm School" (2); 
Junior Music Study Club (4) ; Sigma Sigma Kap- 
pa (3, 4)- 



PAGE THIRTY-FOUR 



1 



THE SENIOR CLASS 



Margaret Smith, A.B. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Alabama College (i, a) ; Y. W. C. A. (i, 2) ; Glee 

Club ( 3) 4). 



Walter Smith, B.S. 

n k a 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Percy Still, B.S. 

A E A 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Evelyn Strickland, A.B. 

1 1 x 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Athens College (1); Le Cercle Francais (1); Or- 
gan Medal (1, 3); Vice-President Math Club (1); 
Phi Sigma Literary Society (1) ; Piano Medal (3) ; 
Allied Arts Club (2, 3, 4) ; Y. W. C. A. Pianist 
(2); Honor Roll (1, 3); Parade Committee (4). 





1 






PAGE THIRTY-FIVE 



THE SENIOR CLASS 




Gladys Timmons, A.B. 

B * A, X A <I>, ESK 
GADSDEN, ALABAMA 

Chi Delta Phi, Vice-President (4) ; Book Lovers' 

Club, Vice-President (4) ; V. W. A., Vice-President 

(4) ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (4). 



Mildred Lorene Towry, A.B. 

2 I X 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Birmingham-Southern (1, 2, 3); Glee Club (1); 
Belles Lettres Literary Society (1, 2); Feature Sec- 
tion (4). 



Freida Traweek, A.B. 

B <l> A 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3); Basketball (3); Book 

Lovers' Club (4); P. W. G. at Blue Ridge (3); 

W. A. A. (3, 4). 



Wallace Ward, A.B. 

z <i> e, n k e 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

University of Alabama (2) ; Crimson Staff (3, 4) ; 
Editor Junior Edition Crimson (3), Business Man- 
ager (4) ; Entre Nous Staff (3, 4), Assistant Busi- 
ness Manager (3), Assistant Editor (4); Student 
Council (3); Bronze Honor Award (3); Gold 
Honor Award (4) ; Parade Committee (4) ; Pan- 
Hellenic Council (3, 4); Vice-President Senior 
Class (4); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (4). 



PAGE THIRTY-SIX 



THE SENIOR CLASS 



J. W. Wells, A.B. 

CORDOVA, ALABAMA 

Mathematics Medal (i); Ministerial Association 
(i, 2, 3, 4), President (3) ; Chairman Pulpit Sup- 
ply Committee (4) ; Delegate to Annual Preachers' 
Conference (3). 



Curtis Theron Williams, A.B. 

X z r, K <I> K 
MILLPORT, ALABAMA 

Director College Chorus and Quartet (1, 2, 3); 
Allied Arts Club (i, 2, 3, 4) ; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 

(3). 



Grover Williams, B.S. 

I. <!> E 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Tennis Team (1, 2, 3, 4) ; B. S. U. (i, 2, 4), Sec- 
retary (1), Treasurer (2); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 
(3, 4), Vice-President (3), President (4) ; President 
Tennis Team (3); Band (1, 2, 3). 



Tera Dell Williams, A.B. 

SIX, 2 1 K 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Secretary Freshman Class (1); Secretary Sopho- 
more Class (2); Vice-President Junior Class (3); 
Pan-Hellenic Council (3, 4), Treasurer (4) ; Sigma 
Sigma Kappa, Treasurer (4) ; Student Council 
(4) ; Beauty Section of Entre Nous (3) ; Maid 
Howard-Duquesne Game (4). 




PAGE THIRTY-SEVEN 



Senior Class History 







f 





VRIAD rills merge to form the brook in the valley. Then, in a body, the rills 
flow along until the brook joins the river and the little rills that flowed together 
lose each other in conflicting currents. 

So are college men and women. They come from myriad walks of life to be 
joined together for a brief time on the college campus. During their stay on the 
campus they live in a community where their aims and ideals are centralized. 
Each meets and knows the other. Friendships are formed. Love buds and blos- 
soms. Then graduation day comes and part of the community moves away. 
The Class of '32 has lived most of its allotted day on the Howard College 
campus. Graduation day soon will come and members of the class will leave the community 
as they came — as individuals following individual roads in life. 

As freshmen, members of the Class of '32 learned the intricate workings of the complex life 
of the community in which they were to live four years. The learning was not easy and, at 
times, not pleasant. But they learned . . . their teachers were upperclassmen . . . their text- 
books often paddles. 

The things taught Howard freshmen are the heritage of Howard men and women, the code 
b) which Howard men and women live while they are a part of the campus community. 

Freshman days were happy days for members of the Class of '32. As freshmen, they were 
steeped in the lore of "how the Bulldog met the Panther." The cry on the campus was "Keep 
Southern Beat." The freshmen learned the Alma Mater Song, for well each knew any night an 
upperclassman might stop him or her on the campus, carry him or her to the steps of Old Main 
Building and demand a "recital" of the Alma Mater Song. 

In many ways 192S was a memorable year for members of the class. Howard "kept" South- 
ern beat. After the Christmas holidays the freshmen did not feel their lives were such lowly 
ones; they looked on the tasks assigned them by upperclassmen as less menial. They were be- 
coming accustomed to the life of the campus community. The heritage of the institution was 
taking root. 

George Cary (who left Howard at the end of his sophomore year to attend another institu- 
tion) was president of the Class of '32 during its infancy on Howard campus, and he led the 
class with a zealous pleasure that bespeaks the leader. 

Sophomore! Ah, that day in September, 1929, when members of the Class of '32 returned 
to the campus as upperclassmen, that day when there were students on Howard campus more 
lowly than they. Already initiated into the campus life, already steeped in the lore of the cam- 
pus, what more was there for these sophomores? They were to learn. 

Freshmen are required to keep up their studies, but professors are lenient when college men 
and women are adjusting themselves to surroundings of the campus community. But the sopho- 
more year is different. This year college men and women take up the duties of a scholar. 
The abruptness of transition makes professors and seniors appear stern and relentless to the 
sophomore. 

During the sophomore year of the Class of '32, Howard again "kept" Southern beat. In 
March, 1930, a drive was started to erect a student activities building on the campus. By the 
end of the scholastic year enough funds had been raised by the student body and faculty to start 
work on the structure. The cafeteria replaced the old "mess" hall in the men's dormitory this 
year. 

Charles Willis Robinett was president of the Class of '32 during its sophomore year. Col- 
lege men and women are led easily with a smile and a gloved will. 



PAGE THIRTY-EIGHT 



By the time college men and women have become juniors they are ready to begin the acqui- 
sition of an education. If ever they are to have it, they have acquired by this time the desire 
for knowledge. This year they get the "meat" they came to college to get. They have, in their 
junior year, begun to take on the polish and the finished quality that bespeaks the college-bred 
man or woman. 

Returning to school after the 1930 Summer vacation, members of the Class of '32 found the 
student activities building almost completed. Compulsory physical education for men and wo- 
men was added to the curriculum in October. 

Three catastrophes befell the college during the junior year of the Class of '32 . . . three 
catastrophes that tested the strength of the men and women of the class, proved their will and 
brought out the characteristic qualities each individual possessed. And particularly did these 
catastrophes bring out the qualities of will and goodness acquired by the individual during his 
or her stay in the college community. 

For the first time in ten years Howard lost a football game to Birmingham-Southern College. 
The sweetness of triumph is accentuated by defeat. But the taste of defeat is bitter and only 
victory can sweeten that bitterness. 

Dr. John C. Dawson resigned as president of the college in January. In February he left 
the president's chair. But "men may come and men may go;" but colleges go on forever. 
Prof. Theophilus R. Eagles became acting president and the students rallied to his standard. 

In April fire destroyed the third floor of the men's dormitory. The second floor was badly 
damaged and men students were forced to lodge themselves off the campus during the rest of 
the scholastic year. 

In the meantime, amid difficulties threatening the morale of the college and serving as a 
wedge in the peaceful campus life, constructive work was being carried on. The library was 
remodeled and many new volumes added during the Winter of the junior year of the Class of 
'32. Hockey for women was added to the college sports. 

Ray Parks was president of the Class of '32 during its junior year. Simplicity in leaders 
is a virtue and a mark of greatness. 

The education for which college men and women are given groundwork for their sopho- 
more year and which is acquired during the junior year must be polished during the senior year. 
Dignity and grace, the ability to discuss prize fights and the opera in a single evening and the 
ability to be oneself on all occasions and in all situations are acquired during the senior year. 

The senior year was the year of members of the Class of '32 . . . their year to lead the com- 
munity . . . their year to follow the steps of men and women who went before them through 
the doors of Howard College. 

The Entre Nous is the record of the Class of '32, the lasting milestone that marks the end. 

Glories lost were won again and bitterness sweetened during the senior year of the class. 
The Southern Panther again bowed before the mighty Bulldog and members of the Class of '32 
were given the right to go out and look Birmingham-Southern men and women of '32 in the eye 
and say with pride, if not with dignity of speech, "My Alma Mater could lick your Alma Mater." 

John Barton was honored with leadership of the Class of '32 during its senior year. As he 
will lead the class to the portals wherefrom men and women worthy of the stamp "college man" 
and "college woman" ever may pass, so may he lead in the field of life wherein he chooses to 
cast his lot. 

Part of the community that is Howard College, the part that is the Class of '32, is about to 
move away into a myriad other communities. College is like a brook ... a brook that bears 
sediment-laden particles of water from the rills to the great river. And as each particle of water 
carries a bit of sediment to the plain watered by the river, may each student carry a bit of worth- 
filled sediment to those with whom he or she is to be associated in future life. 

Braxton B. Carr, '32. 



PAGE THIRTY-NINE 



Nature's School 



"Learn of me," said the cloud, 
"That dreams are meant for doers. 
In my changeable forms 
There lies the key of inspiration." 

"Learn of me," said the wind, 
"My call is low and wistful. 
In my voice you will hear 
The cadent songs of poetry." 

"Learn of me," said the earth, 
"Production is your duty. 
In my sod you will find 
The aim of all our being." 

"Learn of me," said the oak, 
"And I will teach you silence. 
In my shade you may gain 
The still peace of patience." 

Nature's school teaches well. 
The cloud, the wind, the earth, the 
Oak, who now releasing us, 
Have taught the best of living. 

Sylvia Sisson, 
Senior Class Poet 



PAGE FORTY 






Sweeney, Smith. Vice. Randolph 



• OfMCERS . 

Eu Sweeney President 

Lonnell Smith Fire-President 

Leanora Vice Secretary 

Victor Randolph Treasurer 




ii mob; iir\ss 




J 



Class 



Elaine Aarox 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Music Medal (1, 2); Glee Club (1. 21; Book 

Lovers' Club (2, 3); ST. W. C. A. (1, 2, 3); 

Allied Arts Club (1, 2, 3). 

Mary Cade Aldridge 
a o n 

MOBILE, ALABAMA 

Randolph-Macon (1, 2); Beauty Section (2, 3); 
S. T. A. B. (1, 2); Basketball (2). 

Edgar A. Almgren 

II K '1', A E A 

FAIRFIELD, ALABAMA 

Pan-Hellenic Council (2). 

Evie Mae Axsley 

A A II 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Assistant Business Manager' "Entre Nous" (3); 
Sophomore Edition "Crimson" (2). 



Wilbur Bi.ackmox 
i x, ii k e 

OPELIKA, ALABAMA 

Birmingham News Scholarship; President 
Freshman Class (1); President Sophomore Class 
(2); Assistant Editor "Crimson" (2); Editor 
"Crimson" (3); "Entre Nous" Staff ()3; Pan- 
Hellenic Council (3); Pi Kappa Theta, Presi- 
dent (3). 



Hexdox Blavlock 

II K A 

ENSLEY, ALABAMA 

Band (1, 2, 31; Assistant Business Manager 
"Entre Nous" (3). 

J. W. Bradford 

n k a 

SPRINGVILLE, ALABAMA 

Alfred Browx 

A A T 

GORDO, ALABAMA 

Football (1, 2, 3); Basketball (1, 2. 3); Baseball 
(1, 2); Who's Who (3). 



PAGE FORTY-TWO 




Junior Class 



J. N. Brown 

S N 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



James Rankin Burns 

n k * 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Pan-Hellenic Council (3), Secretary-Treasurer 
(3); Allied Aits Club (3). 

Bel lah Caudell 

a a e, n k e 

FALKVILLE, ALABAMA 

"Entre Nous" Staff (1, 3); Y. W. A.. President 
(2); May Queen (1); B. S. U. Cm. nil. Secre- 
tary (li, Reporter (2), Vice-President (3); 
Pan-Hellenic Council (3); W. A. A. Board i :: i ; 
V. \v. ( •. A. Cabinet (3); Women's Student 
Government (3); Dramatic Club (1); "Crimson" 
Staff (2. 3); Treasurer Pi Kappa Theta (3); 
Women's Debating Team (1); Vice-President 
State B. S. U. (2); Tennis Team (2); Basketball 
Team (2). 

Robert Clark 
e k n 

AMARILLO, TEXAS 
Football (1, 2, 3); Track (1, 2, 3). 



Evelyn Collins 

<1> M 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Alabama College (1, 2); Glee Club (1. 2); Sec- 
retary Music Council of Clubs (1, 2). 

William Crowder 

II K A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Chemistry Assistant (3). 

Lillian Cunningham 

B <I> A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Freshman Commission (1); V. W. C. A. Cab- 
inet (2, 3i; Allied Arts Club (2, 3); Honor 
Roll (2, 3). 

Kathryn Louise Davis 

A Z 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Maid, Howard-Duquesne Game (3); W. A. A. 
Board (2, 3), Secretary (3). 



PAGE FORTY-THREE 




. 





Ui 




Wfl 






W\ 


4\ 1 




Charles Donald 

X -I> E, A E & 

FAIRFIELD, ALABAMA 

Honor Roll (3); "Crimson" Business Staff (3). 



Herbert A. Eubank. 

2 N 

ENSLEY, ALABAMA 

Student Council (3); Parade Committee (3); 
Who's Who (1, 2, 3). 



Curtis Allen Douglas 

e k n 

PARRISH, ALABAMA 
Foothall (1, 2, 3). 

Anna Stuart Duply 

A Z 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

President Freshman Commission (1); Y. W. C. 
A. Cabinet (2, 3), Vice-President (31; Pan-Hel- 
lenic Council (3); Parade Committee (3). 

Pete Estes 

A A T 
CULLMAN, ALABAMA 



Richard Worley Field 



ENSLEY, ALABAMA 

Head Cheer Leader (2); FootbaU (3); Allied 
Arts Club (2, 3); Parade Committee (2, 3); 
"Crimson" Staff (2); Chairman Election Com- 
mittee (2); Who's Who (3). 



Frank Fleming 

IT K <!>, X A £ 

LUVERNE, ALABAMA 

Honor Roll (1); Scientific Society (1, 2); Glee 
Club (1); Chemistry Laboratory Assistant (2); 
Assistant Business Manager "Crimson" (II, Cir- 
culation Manager (2); Physics Laboratory As- 
sistant (3); "Entre Nous" Staff (3); Pan-Hel- 
lenic Council (3); Student Council (3). 



William Jake Freeman 

II K A 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Band (1, 



2, 3) ; Freshman Foothall Manager 
(2); Pan-Hellenic (3). 



PAGE FORTY-FOUR 




Frances Virginia Fuller 

A A II 
PERRYVILLE, ALABAMA 

Allied Arts Club (1, 2, 3); Vice-President Dor- 
mitory Council (2): Wing; President (3); Y. W. 
A., Secretary, Treasurer (3); Student Council 
(3); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3). 

Dorothy Lee Galloway 

A Z 

PINEVILLE, KENTUCKY 

Y. W. A., Vice-President (2); Women's Student 
Council (3). 

Robert Hexley Givens 

n k a 

ANDALUSIA, ALABAMA 

Glee Club (1); Student Council (1. 2); Y. M. 
C. A. Cabinet (2); Pan-Hellenic Council (2). 

Robert Glenn 

ATTALLA, ALABAMA 

Football (1, 2, 3). 



Wilbur Graves 

e k x 

COLLINSVILLE, ALABAMA 
Band (1. 2, 3). 

Mary Elizabeth Gray 

A A II 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Maid, Howard-Southern Came (3); 1". W. C. A. 
(2, 3); Glee Club (2, 3). 

Aubrey Gresham 

A A T 
TALLASSEE, ALABAMA 

Football (1, 2, 3); Basketball (2); Baseball (1, 
2); H Club (2, 3). 

Leila Mae Griffith 
2 i x 

TARRANT, ALABAMA 

Glee Club (2, 3). 



PAGE FORTY-FIVE 




Junior Class 



Mildred Guest 
i i x 

FORT PAYNE, ALABAMA 

Piano Medal (l»; Y. W. A. (1, 2. 3 > ; Secretary 
Women's student Government (2, :i>. 



Jl'STYNE TALLULAH KEITH 

a a e 

ENSLEY, ALABAMA 

Swimming Team (2); Band Sponsor (2, 3); W. 
A. A. Ci). 



W. B. Harrell 

2 N 
THOMASTON, ALABAMA 

'Crimson" Staff; Y. M. C. A.; Parade Com- 
mittee. 



Bert Kimbrough 
e k n 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Viee-President Fresbman ('hiss (1); Y. M. C. A. 
< ■;! liinet (2); Basketball (1, 21; Baseball (2). 



Jeanne Hearn 

A. A 6 

TARRANT, ALABAMA 

Glee Club (3); Music Study Club CD. 

Marguerite Jones 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 
Jacksonville State Normal (2). 



Robert Paul Kincaid 

X N 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Football (1, 2, 3); Basketball (2); Baseball (1); 
H Club (2, 3). 

KlRBY K. KlRKPATRICK 

II K A 

HASKELL, TEXAS 

Wayland Junior College (I. 2); Football (1, 
2, 3). 



PAGE FORTY-SIX 




Junior Class 



Coleman Lamb 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Ministerial Association (1, 2, 3>; Men's Foren- 
sic Club (2); Intercollegiate Debating Council 
(3). 



Z. A. Laney 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Football (1, 2. 3); Baseball (1); H Club (1, 
2, 3). 



Dinnie May Mackey 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 
Y. W. C. A. (1, 2, 3); Baseball Team (3). 

Ruth Max ley 
* M 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



DeWitt Matthews 

It K 

FLORALA, ALABAMA 

Forensic Council (1); Glee Club (1): Student 
Council (2); Ministerial Association (1 2 3>- 
B. S. U., Vice-President (2, :i i ; President State 
B. S. U. (3); "Crimson" Staff (2. 3>; Y. M. C. 
A. Cabinet, Secretary (2). 



Florence Mae McCoy 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Glee club (2. :'.). 

Ransom Chapman Meadows 

A A T 

LOWNDESBORO, ALABAMA 

Freshman Baseball Manager (1); Assistant 
Varsity Baseball Manager (2); Assistant Var- 
sity Football Manager 13); Pan-Hellenic Coun- 
cil (2, 3); Honor Roll (2); Y. M. c. A. Cabinet 
(3). 



Nina Miglionica 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Freshman Commission (1); Honor Roll (I)- 

.Mathematics Medal (1); Marshal (1)- Allied 

Arts Club (1, 2. 3); Book Lovers' Club (1 2)' 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2); Glee Club (2) 



PAGE FORTY-SEVEN 




Elizabeth Miller 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Y. W. C. A. (1, 2. 31; B. S. U. Council (3); 
Student Mission Band (2, 3). 

Eloise Montgomery 

* M 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Harvey Moore 

e K X, A K 

BURKBURNETT, TEXAS 

Football (1. 2, 3); Amarillo Junior College (1); 
Wichita Junior College (2); Basketball (3); 

Kappa Theta Pi (1, 2). 

Helen Morland 

A A II 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Sullins College (1, 2); Delta Psi Omega (2); 
Tennis Captain (2); Swimming Team (2,1 ; Dra- 
matic- Club (1, 2). 



Ellis Page 

e k x 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Baseball (1, 2, 3); Varsity Manager Football 
(2). 



Carl Park 
n k *, n r m 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Glee Club (1); Treasurer Student Body (3); 
President-elect of Student Body. 



R. B. Peace 

SPRINGVILLE, ALABAMA 

Ministerial Association (1, 2, 3); Y. M. C. A. 

(2, 3); Basketball (1). 

Robert C. Perry 

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA 

Ministerial Association (1, 2, 3): Student Mis- 
sion Band (2, 3); Chorister (2. 3); College 
C us (2, 3); Allied Arts Club (1, 2, 3). 



PAGE FORTY-EIGHT 



1 







I 



Charles Pierson 

BIG SPRING, TEXAS 
Ministerial Association (1, 2, 3); Band (1, 3). 

Elsie Prewitt 

a a n 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Secretary Freshman. Sophomore Classes (1, 2); 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (-', 3), Secretary (3); Al- 
lied Arts Club, Secretary (3); "Miss Howard" 
(2); "Entre Nous"' Staff (2); "Crimson" Staff 
(2, 3); Parade Committee (3). 



Frances Price 

X Q 

FLORALA, ALABAMA 

William and Marv (1); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2, 

3); Book Lovers' Club (2, 3); Beauty Section 

(3). 



Victor Randolph 
e k n 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Baseball (1); Basketball (1, 2); Treasurer Jun- 
ior Class (31. 



Francis Ernest Smith 

G K X 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Glee Club (1, 2); Chi Alpha Sigma (1, 2). 

Lonnell Smith 
a a e 

COTTONWOOD, ALABAMA 

Varsity Basketball (1); May Queen (2): B. S 
V. Council (2); W. A. A. (2. 3); Class Basket- 
ball (2); Tennis (2, 3); Honor Roll (2); Allied 
Arts Club (l, 2. 31: Vice-President Junior Class 
(3); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3): Parade Commit- 
tee (3); "Crimson" Staff (2, 3); Music Study 
Club (3); Candidate for Feature Section. 

Lucile Smith 

a a e 

COTTONWOOD, ALABAMA 

Freshman Commission (1): w. A. A. (2); Pan- 
Hellenie Council (2, 3); Glee club (2, 3); Soph- 
omore Tennis Champion (2); B. S. U. Council 
(2); Music Study Club (3). 

Thomas F. Smith 
n k a 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



PAGE FORTY-NINE 







Junior Class 



Marion Stallworth 

a a e 

BEATRICE, ALABAMA 

Basketball (1, 2); W. A. A. (2, 3); Junior 
Hockey Chairman (3); Hiking Leader (2); 
Harmony Medal (1); Piano Orchestra (1, 2); 
Dormitory Council 12. 3), Treasurer (2), Vice- 
President (3); B. S. U. Council, Pianist (2); 
Honor Roll (2); Girls' H Club (1); Pan-Hel- 
lenic Council (2); H. N. Y. C. Club, President 
(3). 



William Staples 
x s r 

PARIS, TEXAS 

Allen Military Academy (1); Paris Junior Col- 
lege (2); Football (1, 2, 31. 

Emory Stovall 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Ed Sweeney 

G K N 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Football (1, 2. 3); Baseball (1, 2); H Club (1, 

2); Pan-Hellenic Council (3); President Junior 

Class (3); Who's Who, Popular Boy (3). 



Louise Tippin 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Merle Trammell 

a a e 

TRAFFORD, ALABAMA 

Odell Turner 

A Z 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Freshman Commission (1); Dramatic Club (1); 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2); Girls' Glee Club (2); 

W. A. A. (2, 3). 



Ward Upton 

2 * E 

WYLAM, ALABAMA 

"Crimson" Business Staff (1, 31; Sophomore 
Edition "Crimson" (2); Circulation Manager 
"Crimson" (3); Pan-Hellenic (2, 3); Math- 
ematics Club (1); Business Staff "Entre Nous" 
(2). 



PAGE FIFTY 











1 **J> IT*- GV 




/ 


^ 


%" J 



Jmeior Class 



Leanora Vice 

S I X 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Pan-Hellenic Council (3); "Entre Nous" Staff 
(3); Secretary Junior Class (3). 

Clayton Waddell 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

B. S. V. Council (3). 



Jennie Williams 
i i x 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Catherine Williams 

B <I> A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

W. i '. A. Cabinet (2. 3); \V. A. A. (5 
Basketball (3). 



Louise Walsh 

SELMA, ALABAMA 

Gertrude Whaley 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Freshman Commission (1); V. W. C. A. (1); 
Honor Roll (2). 



Amasa Windham 
s N, 11 k e, ST 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Allied Arts Club (1, 2, 3); ''Entre Nous" Staff 
(1, 2, 3), Assistant Editor (3); "Crimson" Staff 
(1, 2. 3); Cheer Leader (3); Howard-Southern 
Parade Director (2, 3); Director Freshman 
Stunt (1); Director Sophomore Stunt (2); 
Who's Who, Wittiest (2. 3); Politician (3); Y. 
M. C. A. (1. 2, 3); B. S. U. (2. 3); Honor Roll 
(1); "The Charm School" ill; "The New Co- 
ed" (2). 



Annie Ruth Wynn 

B * A 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

President, Chi Delta Phi (3). 



PAGE FIFTY-ONE 




PAGE FIFTY-TWO 






WalJrond, Overton, Ewins 



or mcers 



E. T. Waldroxd President 

Hickman Ewing .... Vice-President 
Eleanor Overton Secretary 




MIPHOMOKI lilt* 




Sophomore Class 



Mary Algee, A A II . . 



Birmingham, Ala. 



Glee Cluli (1. 2); Y. AY. C. A. Cabinet <:!); Allied Arts 

Club (1, 2); Book Lovers' Club (1. 2); Music Study 

Club (2). 



Joseph Anderson ...... Thomasville, Ala. 



Robert Ansley, S N, IT K 9 . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Treasurer Freshman Class (1); Assistant Cheer Leader 
(1); "The New Co-Ed" (1): Freshman Editor "Crim- 
son" (1); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. Pianist (1). Vice-Presi- 
dent (2); Honor Roll (1); Freshman Marshal (1); 
Assistant Editor "Crimson" (2). 



Eleanor Arendale . 



. Birmingham, Ala. 



Glee Club (1, 2); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2); Allied Arts 
Club (1, 2). 



Frances Awtrey, $ M 



. Steele, Ala. 



Vice-President Freshman Commission (1); Dormitory 
Council (1). 



Melvin Bentley, 2 N Bessemer, Ala. 

Citadel (1); Cheer Leader (2). 

Mada R. Berry, A A 8, II K 6 . Birmingham, Ala. 

Birmingham News Scholarship; Freshman Commis- 
sion. Vice-President (1); Freshman Commission Di- 
rector (2); W. A. A. Board (1); Book Lovers' Club 
(1, 2); "Crimson" Staff (2); "Entre Nous" Staff (2); 
Glee Club (2). 

Lillian Brewton Birmingham, Ala. 

Mildred Brooks Birmingham, Ala. 

Sophomore Hockey Manager (2); Freshman Basketball 
Team (1); Y. W. C. A. (1, 2); \V. A. A. Board (2i. 

Barto Brown Birmingham, Ala. 

Elizabeth Brown, 3> M . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

"Entre Nous" Staff (1. 2). 

Roland Carlson Birmingham, Ala. 



PAGE FIFTY-FOUR 



Sophomore Class 



Dorothy Cason, A Z . . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Y. W. C. A. (1, 2): Manager Freshman Athletics (1); 
Manager Basketball (2) ; Baseball (1); Basketball (1, 

2), Captain (1); W. A. A. Board (1, 2). 



Glendolyn Cole, A Z . . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

W. A. A. Board (2); Baseball Chairman (21. 



James Cooper, IT K 6 



Birmingham, Ala. 



'Crimson" Staff (1, 2); "Entre Nous" Staff (2); Pa- 
rade Committee (1, 2). 



Charles Ellison Cosby 



Birmingham, Ala. 



B. S. V., chorister (2); Physics Laboratory Assistant 
(2). 



Louise Detamore, 15 <b A . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Freshman Commission (1); W. A. A. Board (2). 

Thomas Douglas, 2 N . . . . Birmingham, Ala. 
Thelma Duke Birmingham, Ala. 

Hickman Ewing, 9 K N . . . . Memphis, Tenn. 

Vice-President Sophomore class (2); Football (1. 2); 
Basketball (1). 

Joe Anthony Falletta, 2 <I> E . Birmingham, Ala. 
Who's Who, Best Dressed Boy (1, 2). 

Roy Edward Fayet, n K A . . . . Ensley, Ala. 

Football (1, 2); Baseball (1, 2); "Entre Nous" Staff 
(2k 

Jeremiah Fenn, 9 K N . . . Birmingham, Ala. 
Ben Fontille, 9 K N . . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Football (1, 2). 




PAGE FIFTY-FIVE 




Sophoniore Class 

E. H. Fuller, 2 N Cullman, Ala. 

Russell Garrett Albertville, Ala. 

Football (1, 2). 

Lee Price Goff, B <J> A, A K . Birmingham, Ala. 

Parade Committee (2); Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (2); Char- 
ter Member, Delta Kappa (2); Editor "Bull Pup" (2). 

Paul Gwin, II K <i> Summit, Ala. 

Louise Harrison, II K 6 . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

"Crimson" Staff (1, 2); Assistant Editor Freshman 
Edition "Crimson" (1); Glee Club (1, 2); Business 
Committee (2); Book Lovers' Club (1, 2); W. A. A. 
Board (1, 2); Y. \V. C. A. Cabinet (1, 2); Honor 
Roll (1, 2). 

Frank C. Hicks, II K A . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Mabel Hudson Birmingham, Ala. 

Charley Hulsey Jasper, Ala. 

Football (1, 2), Captain (1). 

Henry Johnson, 2 $ E . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

"Crimson" Staff (2). 

Sam Jones, II K <J> Pineapple, Ala. 

Lamar Kennedy, K N . . . . Brundidge, Ala. 

Robert King, 2 N, A K . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

President Freshman Class (1); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 
(2). 



PAGE FIFTY-SIX 



Sophomore Class 

Elizabeth Kronenberg, IT K 9 . Brookside, Ala. 
"Crimson" staff <1. 2); Book Lovers" Club (2). 

Walls Lamberth, 2 X . . . Alexander City, Ala. 
Men's Pan-Hellenic Council (2). 

Dorothy Lanier, A Z . . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

B. Larrimore, X ^ F Dickinson, Ala. 

Thomas Lawsox, A A T . . . Bay Minette, Ala. 
Football (1, 2); Basketball (1). 

Edwin Herbert Lykes, 9 K X . Birmingham, Ala. 

MajelMaxgum, A Z, n K 8, A K . Bir mingham, Ala. 

Allied Arts Club (1, 2); "The New Coed" (1); Re- 
porter (2); "The Importance of Being Earnest" (2); 
B. S. L". Council, Reporter (2); "Crimson" Staff (1, 2); 
Y. AY. C. A. Cabinet (2); W. A. A. Board (2); Inter- 
collegiate Debating Council. Secretary, Reporter (2); 
Physical Education Director (2). 

Edward Mason, 2 X . . . Columbus GroYe, O. 
Stanley' Mate Birmingham, Ala. 

Football (2); Business Manager Freshman Edition of 
"Crimson" (1). 

Marjorie Mauney, A Z, B LT 9 . Birmingham, Ala. 

Allied Arts Club (1, 2); Glee Club (1, 2); Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet (1, 2); \V. A. A. (1); Honor Roll (1); "Crim- 
son" Staff (2). 



Dorothy McKinney 



Birmingham, Ala. 



Honor Roll (1); Basketball Tournament (1); Delegate 

to A. C. A. C. W. Conference (2); W. A. A. Board 

(2). 



Campbell Napier, 2 N . . . Birmingham, Ala. 
B. S. U., Treasurer (2). 




PAGE FIFTY-SEVEN 




Sophomore Class 

Mary NunneLLEy, A Z . . . . Birmingham, Ala. 
Harlan Ogle, 9 K N . . . . Birmingham, Ala. 
Alvan Outland, II K A . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

"Entre Nous" Staff (2). 

Eleanor Overton, SIX. . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Glee Club (1, 2 > ; Secretary Sophomore Class (2); 
Beauty Section (2). 

Margaret Padgett, <I> M . . So. Pittsburg, Tenn. 

Y. W. C. A, Cabinet (1. 2). Treasurer (2); Y. W. A., 
President (2); B. S. U. Council (2): Student Coun- 
cil (1. 2); Allied Arts Club (1, 2); Pan-Hellenic Coun- 
cil (2); Dormitory Council (2); "Entre Nous" Staff 
(2). 

Mary Jo Phillips, B * A . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Ruth Powell, A A II Andalusia, Ala. 

June Sharpies, A A IT . . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Beverly Shepard, <I> M . . . . Birmingham, Ala. 
Who's Who, Best Dressed Girl (2). 

Nell Slaughter Phenix, Ala. 

W. A. A. Board (2). 

Henry Smith, n K $ . • . Alexander City, Ala. 

Student Council (2); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2); B. S. 

U. Council (2i; Freshman Footba'.I (l); "Entre Nous" 

Staff (2). 

Lee Smith, A A T Bay Minette, Ala. 

Football (1, 2); Basketball (1). 



PAGE FIFTY-EIGHT 



Sophomore Class 

Ernest Stidham, X 2 r . . . Hackleburg, Ala. 
Football (1. 21. 

E. T. Waldrond, n K A . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

President Sophomore Class (2); Band (1 2)- Pan- 
Hellenic (1, 2); Tennis Tournament (1); Basketball 
(1). 

Jean Battle Walker, A A n . Birmingham, Ala. 

Parade Committee (2); Who's Who (1). 

Irving Weinstein Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Joe Mike Wells, n K A . . . . Andalusia, Ala. 

Football (1, 2). 

Delene Williams, 2 I X . . . . Clanton, Ala. 

Bertha Williamson Birmingham, Ala. 

Y. \v. c. A. Cabinet (2). 

W. Grady Winstead, X 2 r . Birmingham, Ala. 

Ministerial Association (1, 2); Student Volunteer (2). 

Mrs. W. Grady Winstead . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Student Volunteer (2). 

Ellostein Wright Birmingham, Ala. 

Book Lovers - Club (1, 2); W. A. A. (1, 2). 




PAGE FIFTY-NINE 




PAGE SIXTY 






Hall, Carver, Steen 



. OIIKIKS . 

Stanley Johnson President 

Robert Hall Vice-President 

Ruth Carver Secretary 

Gary Steen Treasurer 

£ 6C3()O0 5 




iiti\nm\ i\\%s 




Howard Abrams, II K A Ohatchee, Ala. 

Fred Andrews, II K A Birmingham, Ala. 

Julius Avery Coosa, Ga. 

Roland Bailey, 8 K N Birmingham, Ala. 

John Barnes Mobile, Ala. 

Lois Barnhart, A A II Birmingham, Ala. 

Theo Bozeman, B <I> A ... Birmingham, Ala. 

Doris Bridges, <l> M Birmingham, Ala. 

Howard Bryant Anniston, Ala. 

Aii.ee n Carlton, AAII Birmingham, Ala. 

Frances Carlton, B <I> A . Birmingham, Ala. 

Ruth Carver, A Z ... Birmingham, Ala. 

Virginia Cobb, A A 9 Birmingham, Ala. 

Kathleen Cooner Birmingham, Ala. 

Thomas Cowan, n K * Grove Hill, Ala. 



PAGE SIXTY-TWO 



1 










Isabella Davies, SIX Birmingham, Ala. 

Frank Downs, 2 N Birmingham, Ala. 

James William Edwards, n K <I> Mobile, Ala. 

Chester Elam Addison, Ala. 

McDuff Fletcher, II K A Birmingham, Ala. 

Thomas Forrester, II K A Birmingham, Ala. 

Louise Franklin, SIX Birmingham, Ala. 

Sidney Gibson, 9 K N Birmingham, Ala. 

Mary Louise Goss, A Z Birmingham, Ala. 

Copeland Graves, II K * Blountsville, Ala. 

Evelyn Grimmer, * M Birmingham, Ala. 

Ruby Hagood Birmingham, Ala. 

Robert Allen Hall, 2 N Birmingham, Ala. 

Frances Hankins Birmingham, Ala. 

Harold Hardin, n K * Sumiton, Ala. 



. 



PAGE SIXTY-THREE 




Margaret Hearn, A A 9 Ensley, Ala. 

Ralph Hood, 2 <p E Fairfield, Ala. 

Evelyn Calhoun Johnson, SIX Birmingham, Ala. 

Hazel Johnson, A A 9 Birmingham, Ala. 

John Johnson • . Georgiana, Ala. 

W. C. Lanham, 2 N Selma, Ala. 

Eunice Long Haleyville, Ala. 

Chester Macomber, 2 [ I> E North Platte, Neb. 

Hardee Martin, A A II Birmingham, Ala. 

Octavia Martin, A Z Birmingham, Ala. 

Bess McComas, * M Birmingham, Ala. 

Clara McEachern, * M Louisville, Ala. 

Clifford McGowin, n K A Georgiana, Ala. 

Algenf. McKinlev, 2 N Birmingham, Ala. 

Guv McKinlev, 2 N Birmingham, Ala. 



PAGE SIXTY-FOUR 





cy o c 

£> f§ -y 

^d Ml V f^WL^m. 





Freshman Class 

Thomas McWhirter, n K * Birmingham, Ala. 

John Miglionica Birmingham, Ala. 

John Milford, 2 N Huntsville, Ala. 

Mary Jo Newell Birmingham, Ala. 

Jessie Joe Nix Birmingham, Ala. 

Gavnell Overbv Birmingham, Ala. 

Eunie Parker, A A II Birmingham, Ala. 

Fred Phillips, II K A Birmingham, Ala. 

Jane Pratt Fairfield, Ala. 

Julian Ragan, II K * Birmingham, Ala. 

Inez Rogers, B $ A Birmingham, Ala. 

John Rogers, G K N Birmingham, Ala. 

Marjorie Roper, SIX Birmingham, Ala. 

Aubry Sanders, 8 K N Parrish, Ala. 

LEONTE Saye, A Z Birmingham, Ala. 



PAGE SIXTY-FIVE 




Freshman Class 

Carl Sides Birmingham, Ala. 

Eugene Sizemoke, X - T Birmingham, Ala. 

Gary Steen, IT K A Birmingham, Ala. 

Mariax Strange, A Z Birmingham, Ala. 

A. B. Stutts, II K * Birmingham, Ala. 

Evelyn Suddeth, 4> M Birmingham, Ala. 

Idell Turner, A Z Birmingham, Ala. 

James Turner, 2 * E Pell City, Ala. 

Price Underwood, II K <I> Birmingham, Ala. 

Annie Ruth Walker Birmingham, Ala. 

Reba Wear, $ M Coushatta, La. 

Ira Weissin.ger, 2 N Opelika, Ala. 

Marguerite Whitemire, A A 9 Birmingham, Ala. 

Dorothy Wilhite Birmingham, Ala. 

Frances Williams, 4> M Birmingham, Ala. 



PAGE SIXTY-SIX 



Alma Mater 



By Dr. George W. Macon (1884) 
Music by Prof. Paul de Launay 



Oh, Howard, Alma Mater true, 

I love thy glorious name, 
Deserving every honor due 

To an unsullied fame. 
I'll love thee through each fleeting breath 

For all that thou hast done, 
And in the agonies of death 

Be still thy loving son. 

Oh, Alma Mater, dear, thy life 

A treasure is to me: 
Thou, Phoenix fair, through flames and strife, 

Hast shown thy right to be. 
Since poverty has made thee rich 

And struggle made thee strong, 
I view thee in thy self-made niche, 

And burst to filial song. 

Oh, parent true, the future fair 

Must hold but good for thee, 
For hope's fruition waits thee there 

In blest reality. 
And sons like thine will make thee shine 

With glory all thine own, 
And bring to thy maternal shrine 

Not gifts of gold alone. 



PAGE SIXTY-SEVEN 




'A day for toil, an hour for sport.' 



p o m t s 





Eaton. McLane, Bancroft 



The Coaches 

L. P. McLANE 

Head Coach 

Coach Eddie McLane has served the college for the 

past three years as head coach of athletics. During this 

time, he has not only won the respect of his teams but of 

every member of the student body. 

WILBUR EATON 
Although serving his first year as assistant coach at 
Howard College, Wilbur Eaton has thoroughly demon- 
strated his ability in this field. His leadership and in- 
struction have been an inspiration to the athletic teams. 

WILLIAM H. BANCROFT 
"Billy" has been a member of the coaching staff since 
his graduation in 1927. He has shown the same qualities 
of sportsmanship and ability in this capacity as he did in 
college. 



PAGE SEVENTY-ONE 



Varsity 
Squad 




Howard, 72; Marion, 

Opening up the season against Marion Insti- 
tute, the Bulldogs gave warning they had plenty 
of power. They defeated the Cadets, 72-0, and 
used the second string men as much as possible. 
There were no outstanding stars in this game. 

Howard, 6; Alabama, 42 

Playing Alabama in the opening game of the 
Crimson schedule, the Bulldogs gave the Tusca- 
loosans quite a scare when they took the ball for 
the first four downs. An untimely fumble in the 
first quarter cost the Baptists a touchdown. The 
Bulldog line outplayed Alabama throughout the 
first half, tiring in the last period when the mighty 
Tide got loose for several touchdowns after send- 
ing in fresh reserves to tire down the Magic City 
team. Alabama's first two touchdowns came from 
passes in the first half. The Bulldogs held them 
14-0 during that period. 



THE 1931 



received in these two games were not ironed out 
for several weeks and may have been the main 
reason for the loss of the Chattanooga game the 
following week. 

Howard, 0; University of Chattanooga, 14 

Leaving several regulars on the campus, the 
Bulldogs started a series of road trips which car- 
ried them on seven successive week-ends to foreign 
gridirons. They met the strong Moccasins at 
Chattanooga and were defeated, 14-0, by the team 
which went through the season undefeated. The 
Moccasins were by every right declared the win- 
ners in the S. I. A. A. for the 1931 season. They 
defeated Birmingham-Southern among others. 



Howard, 3 1 ; Georgia Teachers College, 

Howard, 22; Bowdon College, 7 

Playing the South's first double-header, and 
pulling an iron-man stunt, the Bulldogs met and 
defeated both teams in one night. The injuries 



Howard, 26; Millsaps, 

At Jackson, the East Lakers again hit their 
stride and defeated the Millsaps in a game minus 
thrills. After running up a comfortable lead, the 
Bulldogs mentors sent in the second string team, 




Freshman 
Squad 



SEASON 



which played just as good a game as the regulars. 
Ewing, Hulsey, Moore and Fontile stood out in 
the backfield, while Brown, Scifres, Kirkpatrick 
and Staples played well in the line. 

Howard, 6; Maryville, 6 

Bumping into the strongest team they had 
played all season, the Bulldogs nearly lost the 
Maryville game. They had expected rather an 
easy game but the vicious brand of football dis- 
played by Woodward and Calloway kept the 
Howard players with their backs to the wall. 
Gresham, Hulsey, Herman Clark and Sweeney 
were the outstanding backs, while Scifres and 
Brown at tackles and Carmichael and Laney at 
guards were bulwarks in the line. 

Howard, 7; Souhwestern, 7 

Another tie was in line for the Bulldogs when 
they journeyed to Memphis. After clearly out- 
playing the Lynx, twenty first-downs to one, the 
breaks were suddenly turned to the Memphians. 



Harold High, former Bessemer High star, and 
quarter for the Lynx, grabbed a pass behind his 
goal line in the last five minutes of play and took 
it back the length of the field for the tying touch- 
down. 

Howard, 10; Spring Hill, 

Montgomery fans were thrilled in the Spring 
Hill game by a spectacle very seldom witnessed 
in football — the winning of a game on points 
made by a center. Bondurant, mainstay in the 
Howard line, snagged a deflected pass and 
plunged ten yards over the Mobilians' goal line 
for the first points. Later in the third stanza, 
Bondy dropped back and place-kicked for a field 
goal, giving Howard a clean 10-0 victory over 
Spring Hill. 

Howard, 6; Southern College (Fla.), 

Facing a powerful and a heavier team in 
Dothan, the Baptists started in with a powerful 
line drive in the second quarter that could not be 
stopped by the Floridians. Bondy's try for extra 
point was one of the few he missed during the 
season. All players on the squad had a chance in 
this game, as Coach Eddie McLane and Wilbur 
Eaton used a number of reserves. Staples and 



The 
Managers 




Carroll, Meadows, Huffman, Sanders 



Kirlcpatrick in line stopped numerous drives over 
the forward wall. This was their first time to do 
any outstanding playing. Ewing and Sweeney 
showed up well. 

Howard, 7; Birmingham-Southern, 6 

The annual big battle of the year. After be- 
ing out-played in the first half and being led 6-0 
at the end of that time, the East Siders appeared 
to be a highly over-rated team. They were con- 
sidered as slight favorites to win, and only at the 
beginning of the third quarter did they look like 
the team the papers were talking about. A few 



minutes before the third stanza was over, Eddie 
Sweeney pitched the pigskin thirty yards to 
"Pooch" Fayet, who carried it twenty yards more 
for the touchdown. Bondurant stuck his toe be- 
hind the ball and a perfect place-kick resulted in 
the winning point. The playing of Fayet and 
Parks at ends, Sweeney, Bob Clark, Herman 
Clark, Ewing, Fontille and Hulsey were the bright 
lights in the 7-6 win. 

Howard, 13; Duquesne, 6 

Meeting the famous Night Riders of Pittsburg, 
coached by Elmer Layden, former Notre Dame 



THE 1931 FRESHMAN 



Due to the late arrival of Coach Billy Ban- 
croft, the Howard College Bullpups had a light 
schedule planned out for the 1931 season. Only 
three regular games were included on it, those 
being with the Alabama Baby Crimson Tide, Uni- 
versity of Chattanooga Baby Moccasins and the 
Birmingham-Southern Cubs. 



The Alabama Crimson Tide team rolled over 
them to the tune of 26-0. However, this could 
not be avoided, due to the powerful reserve 
strength of the Tuscaloosans. 

Later on in the season, the Frosh traveled up to 
Chattanooga, where they were downed by the 
"Little Snakes". The Bullpups put up a strong 




Cheer 
Leaders 



Bentley, Etheridge, Windham 



four-horseman, the Bulldogs displayed one of the 
finest brands of football ever seen on Legion 
Field. They had to or they would never have 
beaten the invaders. Pete Estes, flashy halfback, 
was finally given his chance, and in the first quar- 
ter nearly drove over a touchdown by himself. He 
alternated with Hickman Ewing to carry the ball 
down to the Night Riders' 20-yard line before the 
oval went over to the visitors. In the last few sec- 
onds of play in the first half, Roy Kennedy, third 
string quarter, went into the fray, and on the first 
play slung a pass to Herman Clark for the tying 
touchdown. Hulsey missed the goal. 



In the last half, the Bulldogs, led by Williams 
and Ewing, started another drive that went over 
the goal line. This time Bondurant made the ex- 
tra point. When the game ended, Howard had 
the ball on Duquesne's 4-yard line, with Bon- 
durant back to try for a place-kick. 

Thus ended Howard's most successful football 
season in a number of years. 

The Duquesne game closed out the football ca- 
reers of a number of players on the Howard 
squad. Long, Parks, Simmons, Kennamer, Bon- 
durant, Carmichael and Captain Herman Clark 
graduate this year. They will be a serious loss to 
the team. 



FOOTBALL SEASON 



front for the first half, but could not hold out 
the entire game. 

The Birmingham-Southern Panther Cub-How- 
ard Bullpup game proved to be a thriller, even 
though the Howard team was outplayed and out- 
scored, 7-0. They made several nice drives that 
only fell short by yards of the tying score. 



Several of the Frosh squad were "kicked out" 
by the Dixie Conference authorities, but a few 
were reinstated, these being Lenz. W. Smith and 
Everetts. Those still declared ineligible are Wal- 
ter Parker, Harrison Price, "Swede" Johnson, and 
Norman Chevalier. 




CH |K 




FOOTBALL 



Captain Herman Clark, a senior from Alexandria, led his 
teammates through one of the most successful seasons in How- 
ard football history. Since his first 80-yard run in his Sopho- 
more year, "Bottle" has been outstanding in the backfield, a sen- 
sational runner, and can even grab a pass with half a team 
surrounding him. Not only is Herman a cool-headed leader, 
but this boy's gridiron abilities are listed with the success of the 
1931 football season. 



Hickman Ewing, a sophomore from Memphis, was the chief 
ground-gainer for the Bulldogs the past season. His running 
from fullback position strengthened the plunging power of the 
squad and made them a real threat. Hick had a hand injury 
just before the Southwestern game, which almost proved his 
nemesis for the balance of the season; however, that didn't stop 
his playing the remainder of games on schedule. 



Ben Fontille, a sophomore from Ensley High, was a powerful 
line plunger and the main reason for his not being placed on 
the first string team was his lack of experience. Whenever two 
or three yards were needed through the line, the ball was snapped 
to Ben and he made them. 



Pete Estes, a junior from Cullman, was followed all season 
by old man jinx. He was hurt in the opening game of the sea- 
son and hardly had a chance to show his wares until the final 
game of the season against Duquesne. Pete picked up his heels 
and drove the Pittsburgians back into their twenty-yard terri- 
tory early in the first quarter. When Pete hits the ground, he 
has only just begun to go places. 





Howard-Southern game — Speaker, Bridges, Gray 



PAGE SEVENTY-SIX 



FOOTBALL 



Alternate-Captain Guy Carmichael, a senior from Enterprise, 
closed out his college career with a blaze of glory. He was a 
fiery player, and an encouragement to his team at all times. He 
was selected on the All S. I. A. A. eleven his sophomore year 
and has continued his excellent playing throughout his career. 
"Stump" was chosen by many coaches for the All-Dixie Con- 
ference eleven. 



Bob Clark, a junior from Amarillo, Texas, besides doing 
funny things with cards and coins, could also do funny things 
with the pigskin. His speed in circling ends played a great 
part in Howard's victories of the 1931 season. Clark was de- 
clared ineligible by the Dixie Conference authorities and will be 
unable to play next season. 





Russell Garrett, a sophomore from Albertville, one of the 
famous Garrett brothers, was a heads-up football player and when 
teamed with his brother, Gordon, at tackle, he was a pretty thing 
to watch. Russ had little chance to show what he really had this 
season, but next year he is expected to hold down a regular berth 
on the flanks. 



Jake Kennemar, a senior from Birmingham, played a nice 
game at end for the Bulldogs last season, alternating with Fayet 
on the right wing. Most of his power came in the defensive way. 
Opponents found his side of the line very hard to go over, and 
after several tries usually gave up. His services will be missed 
next season. 



Allen Douglas, a junior from Parrish, played into hard luck 
early in the season, going out with a badly injured knee. He 
was still hobbling with a cane when the season ended. Doug 
started off the season as a regular end and had prospects of mak- 
ing an all-Dixie Conference pick. He will be back again next 
season. 







Howard-Birmingham-Southern game 



PAGE SEVENTY-SEVEN 



FOOTBALL 







Tommy Bondurant, a 
player with plenty to talk 
of the Howard team this 
backfield to the line to fill 
uation of Raymond Davis, 
came close to making the 
points scored in the 10-0 
depleted pass, kicking goa 
goal. 



senior from Woodlawn High, is one 
about and he was the main cog in line 
year. Tommy was moved from the 
in the position left open by the grad- 
All S. I. A. A. pivot choice. Tommy 
same pick himself. He made all ten 
victory over Spring Hill, catching a 
1 and later adding to this with a field 



Bill Long, a senior from Ensley High, was another to play 
his last game for Howard against Duquesne. He was a power- 
ful defensive end and was full of the old fighting spirit that kept 
the team going in the pinches. 



Aubrey Gresham, a junior from Tallassee, at quarterback 
has been an outstanding player for the past two years on the 
Bulldog machine. Besides being a fast and shifty player, and 
an excellent blocker, his direction of the team is another point 
in the success of the season. 



Charley Hulsey, a sophomore from Guin, came up from the 
freshman squad of last year and made a powerful cog in the 
Bulldog backfield machine. Due to his light weight and lesser 
experience, he was relegated to the reserve squad, but next sea- 
son it is almost a certainty that he will fill in a regular position 
in Coach Eddie McLane's team. 



Moon Smith, a sophomore from Bay Minette, had little 
chance to play this season due to the large squad of line-men, 
but when given the chance, he got right in there and fought. 
Smith was one of the hardest workers on the squad. Every after- 
noon he was out in uniform and working like a Trojan. 





Howard-Duquesne game — Davis, Bondurant, Williams 



PAGE SEVENTY-EIGHT 



FOOTBALL 



Eddie Sweeney, a junior from Ensley High, was the real 
triple threat man of the Bulldogs this past season. He can punt, 
circle ends, and Oh My! how he can pass a ball. He upheld the 
Howard honors by making the All-S. I. A. A. Conference team 
this year. Eddie, besides being a great football player, was voted 
the most popular boy on the campus. 




Paul Kincaid, a junior of Birmingham, was an old stand-by 
this year, playing a consistent game at all times. He played a 
big part in helping give the Bulldog team the reputation of being 
one of the hardest lines to crack in the S. I. A. A. Kincaid has 
one more year of play and will be depended on by Coach Mac 
to fill in Carmichael's position next season. 



Harvey Moore, a junior from Burkburnett, Texas, came to 
Howard from a Texas junior college and filled in the shoes of 
alternate quarterback creditably the whole season. He is a good 
blocker, punter, and can pass well. Moore has one more year 
to play. 

Robert Glenn, a junior from Attalla, an alternate with 
"Bondy" at the center post, played consistently throughout the 
season. His work in the Birmingham-Southern game was well 
nigh perfect, and almost the same can be said of the balance of 
the season's play. Glenn is slated for the regular pivot position 

next year. 

•w 

Bill Staples, a junior from Paris, Texas, coming from a jun- 
ior college, fell right into the shoes of a reserve tackle. He 
filled them well throughout the season. Bill was really out- 
standing in the Spring Hill game, where time and again he 
brought down runners behind the line. 










visitor. 




Howard-Duquestie game 



PAGE SEVENTY-NINE 




TBALL 



Roy "Pooch" Fayet, a junior from Ensley, was the lightest 
man on the squad, weighing less than 145 pounds, but this did 
not handicap this former Ensley High star. He was picked by 
a number of coaches on the All-S. I. A. A. team. His speed 
on getting down under punts was amazing, downing the re- 
ceiver frequently in his tracks. His timely catches from Sweeney 
were always a serious threat to the opposition. 



Z. A. "Shag" Laney, a junior from Phillips High, was a reg- 
ular starter at the guard post this season along with "Stump". 
Laney is a dependable type player, and is a wall of strength on 
the defense. His work next to "Bondy" was very commendable. 




Ray Parks, a senior from Memphis, Tenn., has played nearly 
every position on the team. In his junior year he played at cen- 
ter and defensive end. Ray played a good deal in the other man's 
backneld this past season, getting down fast under punts and 
little ground was gained around his side of the line. 



Ernest Stidham, a Hackleburg product, is one of the largest 
men on the squad and will be still heavier next season. With 
more experience, he will be a valuable man to the Howard team. 
Whenever he was in the game, he was putting his best forth and 
that was plenty good. 



Swede Lawson, a sophomore from Bay Minette, a reserve 
tackle, was a real cog in the front wall. Lawson is a big man 
and opened hole after hole for the backs to romp through. He 
has two more years of play for the Bulldogs and is expected to 
be a real star next season. 



fSP* 4 ' ♦-, 





Howard-Alabama game 



PAGE EIGHTY 



FOOTBALL 



Worley Field, a junior from Ensley, made such a show in 
the Intra-Mural sports last season that Coach Eddie McLane 
asked him to report for fall training, which he did with a "bang." 
Worley has a pair of the loosest hips seen on Berry Field and 
with the gaining of more experience will surely be a regular. He 
is not only fast, but an accurate passer. 




Joe Mike Wells, a sophomore from Andalusia, is another with 
an ideal build for a guard position. Wells was running in the 
second string line this year and saw a great deal of play as an 
alternate. He is fast and pulls out of the line on the Notre 
Dame shift well. 



Stanley Mate, a sophomore of Birmingham, is built like a 
barn door, and is just as hard to move out of place as a locked 
one. He has the ideal build for a guard and will make a val- 
uable man for next year's team. He is an easy-going player 
and a hard worker. 



Al Brown, a junior from Gordo, was always linked with 
Scifres in most of the starting line-ups of the season. Brown 
was switched from the backfield to fill in the holes left in the 
line by graduation and did a very creditable job. He has one 
more season of play and is expected to be outstanding next year. 



Kirby K. Kirkpatrick, a junior from Haskell, Texas, one of 
the numerous linesmen in the Bulldog line-up, was a tower of 
strength and power in the front wall. At tackle, Kirby played 
a hard and conscientious game throughout the season, and will 
be greatly depended upon next year. 








Captain Clark Gets the Ball 



PAGE EIGHTY-ONE 




The 1931 Baseball Season 

The 1931 baseball team, handicapped by the loss of the 
complete infield works of the preceding year, was defeated by 
Birmingham-Southern for the baseball championship of Birm- 
ingham. This loss broke Howard's long reign in the city in- 
tercollegiate baseball circles. 

Coach "Doc" Newton's task of replacing such stars as 
Spicer, Goodwin, Burns, George and Watson was a hard one 
and several combinations were used before a regular starting 
line-up was selected. After a disastrous start by losing the 
first three games, the Howardites found their stride during 
the latter part of the season. 

The strong University of Alabama nine won the first Bull- 
dog series of the season, taking two straight games. Captain 
Odis Kent, veteran Howard hurler, pitched a nice game in 
the opener but was not supported by his teammates. 

After dropping the first game of the series to Mississippi 
College, the Howardites came back in the second game under 
the brilliant mound work of Ellis Page to register their first 
conference victory. Up to this time the Bulldogs were unable 
to connect with the ball while the pitchers were turning in 
good performances, but the Howard nine found their batting 
eye in this series which accounted for their win. 

A journey to Fort Benning netted the Bulldogs two more 
losses. A necessary shift in the Howard line-up was respon- 
sible for the poor showing against the Georgia soldiers as the 
whole team played erratic ball. Several regulars in the infield 
and outfield were missing in this series. 

Birmingham-Southern won the opening battle in the city 
championship series due to a superb pitching exhibition by 
Captain Jack McCullough of the Panthers. Howard was 
unable to master his delivery in the first game but secured 
sweet revenge in the second encounter, which Howard won. 
McCullough was found for four runs before being removed 
in the second game, which was enough to assure the Bulldogs 
of victory as they played errorless ball. Page, given this lead, 
turned in the best performance on the slab of the series in 
shutting out the Methodists without a serious threat to score. 




Long 

Brown, Kent 

Hinson, Foster 

Manasco 

Sweeney 



PAGE EIGHTY-TWO 



In the next two games, however, Birmingham-Southern 
nosed out the Bulldogs to win the championship for the first 
time in four years. The deciding game of the series was the 
most thrilling, going into extra innings after Max Hinson hit 
a triple which tied the score. Daring base running and a 
timely hit knotted the count but the Panthers came back in 
the next frame, pushed over a run, then held the Bulldogs 
scoreless to win the last game and the Birmingham collegiate 
title. Page and Kent again turned in good pitching exhibi- 
tions for the Howardites. 

The Bulldog nine completed its 1931 season with two vic- 
tories over Jacksonville State Teachers, with Page and Kent 
on the mound. These victories found the Howard team at its 
best form of the year as indicated by the large scores, nu- 
merous base-hits and great defensive work. 

Captain Kent and Page were the mainstays on the hurling 
staff, with Page leading in averages. "Lefty" McLendon, 
"Lefty" Hinson, Bates and Randolph were the other pitchers 
to see service in the Bulldog fold. 

The infield included Hinson at first, Manasco or Goodwin 
at second, Glenn at third, Sweeney or Kimbrough at short. 
Long, Gresham and Davis handled the catching department, 
with Davis doing most of the work before he signed up with 
a big league team. The other two divided the work in the 
remaining contests. 

Bondurant, Parks, Kennemar, Suddeth and Brown per- 
formed in the outfield. The regular line-up usually found 
Bondurant in left field, Parks in center field and Brown or 
Kennemar in right field. The outfield was the only depart- 
ment which found letter men from the past year performing. 
Carroll served as manager of the team. 

Although the season was unsuccessful as far as wins and 
losses were concerned, great work was turned in by the base- 
ball mentors. They started the season off with an inexperi- 
enced team but developed a strong nine before the 1931 sea- 
son was gone. Many new faces were seen in the Bulldog 
line-up, but they did not let their inexperience interfere with 
their playing and improved with every game as the season 
rolled around. The year saw several promising players de- 
veloped and prospects look good for an experienced team for 
the following year. 





Gresha m 

Kennemar 

Bates 

Page. McLendon 

Kimbrough 



PAGE EIGHTY-THREE 





Brown, Dunn, Ewing, Foster, Garrett 



BASKETBALL 



Captain Cherry Foster 

"Cherry", besides being chosen the leader of the '32 
cage team by its members, also led his teammates in 
the art of offense. Foster was considered one of the 
best forwards in the city and his brilliant floor-work 
and shooting stamps him as the peer of Howard's 
basketeers. He closed his collegiate career in a blaze 
of glory in the most thrilling series staged by Howard 
and Birmingham-Southern. 

Irwin Waldrop 

Waldrop, a forward, played his first year as a mem- 
ber of Howard's cagers. He broke into the starting 
lineup soon after the season began and was a main 
cog in the Bulldog machine from then on out. He 
proved to be one of the steadiest men on the team. 



Gordon Garrett 

Gordon, starting the season off at the center posi- 
tion, was switched to a guard post after the season 
progressed and his excellent playing well warranted 
the change. His fine floor-work placed him in 
Howard's opening lineup in practically all the games. 



Russell Garrett 

"Rus", another of the famous Garretts and a 
younger brother of Gordon, performed at forward in 
his first year on the squad. Although his inexperience 
kept him on the side-lines most of the season, he was 
often called upon to fill one of the regular posts 
which he capably did. He gives promise of being a 
mainstay on next year's team. 



Bert Kimbrough 

Bert, although small in stature, did not let this 
handicap him on the court. He was high scorer in 
many of the Bulldog games, dividing time at one of 
the forward positions. Kimbrough's "eagle eye" and 
floor-work were outstanding in the team's success. 



PAGE EIGHTY-FOUR 






R. Garrett, Gresham, Kimbrough, Parks, C. Meadows 



Dewitt Dunn 

Dunn, another sophomore who broke into the 
lineup frequently, was one of the best guards on the 
team. His handling of the ball stamped him as a 
valuable player, accounting for his seeing service in 
most of Howard's games. 



Ernest Stidham 

Stidham, center, pushed Foster closely for scoring 
honors. His skill at hitting the basket reached its 
height during the Bulldog-Panther series, in which 
he was one of the main stars. As he is only a sopho- 
more, he will furnish a nucleus around which the 
1933 team can be built. 



Al Brown 

Another star of the city intercollegiate series was 
developed in the person of Brown, guard. Starting 
off the last game, Al proved to be a thorn in the 
side of Waller, star Panther forward. He held the 
high point man of the series to three points in the 
first half, which accounted for the Howard lead. 



Aubry Gresham 

Gresham, regular guard, excelled in the art of 
bringing the ball down the court. His playing showed 
marks of a veteran throughout the entire season, and 
his experience will strengthen the prospects for a 
better team next year. 

Hickman Ewing 

"Hick", a member of last year's freshman quintet, 
proved to be a valuable reserve on the team this year. 
He was often called upon to relieve one of the regular 
guards and performed his duty on every occasion. 

Ray Parks 

Ray was an all-round player, but held to the for- 
ward position most often. He was outstanding in the 
Alabama game, scoring 14 of the 22 points for 
Howard. 

Howard finished second in the Dixie Conference 
Basketball Tournament. Chattanooga defeated How- 
ard 40-39 for first place. 

Chester, alias "Cherry" Foster was the high scorer 
in the S. I. A. A. and Dixie Conference, scoring 269 
points in 18 games, an average of 15 points per game. 



PAGE EIGHTY-FIVE 



Women's Athletic 




Zou Steele Bass 
Mary Hargrave . 
Kathryn Davis . 



President 

. . . . Vice-President 
Secretary and Treasurer 





Athletic Board 



Zou Steele Bass 
Mildred Brooks 
Dorothy Cason 
Beulah Caudell 
Glendolyn Cole 
Kathryn Davis 
Louise Detamore 



Mary Hargrave 
Louise Harrison 
Majel Mangun 
Dorothy McKinney 
Nell Slaughter 
Marion Stallworth 
Odell Turner 



Director of Women's Athletics 
Emily Cate 





Vr 



Bass, Brooks 

Cason, Caudell 

Cole, Davis 

Detamore, Hargrave 

Harrison, Mangun 

McKinney, Slaughter 

Stallworth, Turner 




page eighty-six 





Women's Athletics 



Sujim ming — Wilson. 

Tennis — Lonnell Smith, Beulah 
Caudell, Lucile Smith, Geraldine 
Harris. 

Baseball — Detamore, Cole, Slaughter. 

Swimming — Zou Steele Bass, Presi- 
dent of W. A. A. 

Hiking — Mangun, StAllworth, Davis. 

Hockey — Atkinson, Hargrave, Brooks. 

Basketball — Sharples, Cason, Cole, 
Mangun, Harris, Brown, Brooks, 
Slaughter, Atkinson. 

Szvi mining — Mangun. 



PAGE EIGHTY-SEVEN 




"In every rank, or great or small, 
Tis industry supports us all/ 7 



D U S T R V 






Bondurant, Colley, Ansley, Park 



. oiiHiies . 

Thomas Bondurant .... President 

J. O. Colley Vice-President 

Edith Ansley Secretary 

Carl Park Treasurer 

6 SttOOO s 




SIIIMM BOD1 





vK >' 





Top row: Reed, Williams. Gay, Fitzpatrick, Fleming 
Second row: Eubank, Fuller, Smith, Padgett, Phillips 



Thomas Bondurant President of Student Body 



Senior Representatives 



Tera Dell Williams 
Emerson Gay 



Margaret Fitzpatrick 
Omer Reed 



Junior Representatives 

Frank Fleming Herbert Eubank 

Frances Fuller 

Sophomore Representatives 
Margaret Padgett Henry Smith 

Freshman Representative 
Fred Phillips 



page ninety-two 




Top row: Carr, Carver, Fitzpatrick, GofC, King 
Second row: Knight, Lamb, Mangun, Moore, Sisson 



Honorary Debating Fraternity 

Marcaret Fitzpatrick President 

Sylvia Sisson Vice-President 

Majel Mangum Recording Secretary 

Lincoln Knight Corresponding Secretary 

Coleman Lamb Treasurer 

Members 

Braxton Carr Robert King 

Ruth Carver Lincoln Knight 

Beulah Caudell Coleman Knight 

Margaret Fitzpatrick Majel Mangun 

Lee Price Goff Harvey Moore 

Sylvia Sisson 

Faculty Advisors 
Vernon L. Mangun Louis W. Lohr 



PAGE NINETY-THREE 




Top row: Caudell. F. Fuller, Galloway 
Second row: Guest: Padgett, Richardson, Stall worth 



Women's Dormitory Council 

Susie Fuller President 

Marion Stallworth Vice-President 

Mildred Guest Secretary-Treasurer 

Elizabeth Richardson Senior Representative 

Beulah Caudell Junior Representative 

Margaret Padgett Sophomore Representative 

Frances Fuller . ■ . . House Representative 

Dorothy Galloway . • . . House Representative 



PAGE NINETY-FOUR 








^ ^ > 



¥ %P 



Top row: Almgren. Crane, Dinsmore, Donald 
Second row: Harrell, Meadows, Rosenthal, Still 



Five Active Chapters 



a 

Pre-]\Ied Fraternity 
Founded at University of Alabama, 1926 

ALPHA BETA CHAPTER 



Colors: Red and Violet 



Fratres in Facultate 

Dr. J. L. Brakefield Dr. John R. Sampey 

Officers 

Howard H. Meadows President 

Howard Crane Vice-President 

Edgar Almgren" Secretary-Treasurer 



Fratres in Collegio 

Class of 1932 
Howard Crane .... Birmingham, Ala. H. H. Meadows . 

Burleson Dinsmore .... Decatur, Ala. Paul Rosenthal . 

Class of 1933 

Edgar Almcren Fairfield, Ala. George Gauggle . 

W. O. Stroud Birmingham, Ala. 



. Lowndesboro, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 



Class of 1934 

Charles Donald Fairfield, Ala. Bill Harrell Birmingham, Ala. 

Clyde Wilson Fairfield, Ala. 



PAGE NINETY-FIVE 




Fitzpatrick, Blair, Prywitt 



Officers 

Margaret Fitzpatrick President 

Frances Blair Vice-President 

Elsie Prewitt Secretary 



Members 



Mary Algee 
Edith Ansley 
Eleanor Arendale 
Pauline Band 
Zou Steele Bass 
Frances Blair 
Julia Brown 
James Burns 
Braxton Carr 
Glendolyn Cole 
Dorothy Craddock 
Lillian Cunningham 
Donald Elwell 
Leonard Etheridge 
Worley Field 
Margaret Fitzpatrick 
Frances Fuller 
Louise Harrison 
Ralph Hood 
Nona Leatherwood 
Majel Mangum 



Octavia Martin 
Marjorie Mauney 
Leo McCown 
Nina Miglionica 
Helen Morland 
Frances Mosley 
Campbell Napier 
Eleanor Overton 
Margaret Padgett 
Robert Perry 
Elsie Prewitt 
Crawford Reed 
Elizabeth Richardson 
Leonte Saye 
Sylvia Sisson 
Lonnell Smith 
Evelyn Strickland 
Louise Tippin 
Idell Turner 
Irving Weinstein 
Amasa Windham 



PAGE NINETY-SIX 




Reed, Fitzpatrick, Mauney 



Beta Pi Theta 

National Honorary French Fraternity 

THETA NU CHAPTER 

Established in IQ26 

Colors: Royal Purple, Gold and White Flower: Fleur-de-Lis 

Officers 

Crawford Reed President 

Margaret Fitzpatrick • Vice-President 

Marjorie Mauney Scretary and Treasurer 

Members 

Edith Ansley Margaret Fitzpatrick 

Mada Berry Olive Henkel 

Mildred Brooks Marjorie Mauney 

Glendolyn Cole Crawford Reed 



PAGE NINETY-SEVEN 




Hargrave, Sisson, Timmons, Wynn 



LI U 

National Honorary Literary Society 
Founded at the University of Tennessee, 1919. 

SORORES IN FACULTATE 
Miss Annie Boyett Miss French Haynes 

SORORES IN COLLEGIO 

Annie Ruth Wynn President 

Gladys Timmons Vice-President 

Mary Hargrave Secretary 

Sylvia Sisson Treasurer 

Frances Farrar Reporter 



PAGE NINETY-EIGHT 



1 





Gof£, Dupuy 



The 



Lee Price Goff Editor 

Anna Stuart Dupuy . Business Manager 



The "Bull Pup" is the handbook of the college, or 
the so-called "Rat Bible." It is issued each year to the 
Freshman Class for their information. The editor and 
business manager are elected in the fall semester by pop- 
ular vote of the student body. 



PAGE NINETY-NINE 




Olin Gay President 

Malcolm Fuller Vice-President 

John Barnes Secretary 

Marvin Gardner Treasurer 

Paul O'Neal Reporter 

Curtis Williams Chorister 

George Moselev Pianist 

J. W. Wells Pulpit Supply Committee 

Members 

Loftin Abrams H. H. Hobbs Arcangelo Pucciarelli 

Julius Avery Robert Hood James L. Robinson 

Joe Bancroft Allen Hyatt Daisey Rowe 

John Barnes Olie Kidd Luther Rowe 

Vernon Brantley Barnett Larrimore Ewell Sexton 

Elmon Brown Roby Lee Nathan Sims 

A. B. Canant Richard Lyons Henry Sisson 

J. O. Colley Coleman Lamb John Smallwood 

Lamar Davis John Johnson Albert Smith 

Oscar Davis Leon Macon Robert Taylor 

Wm. H. Faulkner Gaines Mason Georce Tidwell 

Malcolm Fuller Dewitt Matthews W. C. West 

Lee Gallman Rubin E. Merrell Clayton Waddell 

M. O. Gardner Paul Minton J. W. Wells 

Robert Garmon George Moseley Curtis Williams 

Olin Gay Paul O'Neal Grady Winstead 

John Gibbs R. B. Peace Parks Redwine 

Lawrence Greer Robert Perry G. S. Sorrell 

Charles Pierson 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED 



Girls' Glee Club 



Officers 

Mrs. W. A. Counts . Director 

Elsie Gammill President 

Nina Miglio.vica Accompanist 



Elsie Gammill . 
Nona Leatherwood 





Personnel 






Class 


of 


1932 




Birmingham, 


Ala. 




Sara 


Slaughter . 


. Denver, 


Col. 




Will 


ie Slaughter 



. Birmingham, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 



Elaine Aaron . 
Frances Blair . . . 
Leila Mae Griffith 



Class of 1933 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Jean Hearn . 
Lonnell Smith 
Lucile Smith . 



Birmingham, Ala. 

Cottonwood, Ala. 

. Cottonwood, Ala. 



Class of 1934 

Eleanor Arendale . . . Birmingham, Ala. Emma Lee Johnson . 

Mary Algee Birmingham, Ala. Kate Malone . . . 

Julia Brown Birmingham, Ala. Eleanor Overton . 

Annie Mae Crumpton . Birmingham, Ala. Hughie Pierson . . 

Betty Dickinson . . . Birmingham, Ala. Edna Stewart . 

Louise Harrison .... Birmingham, Ala. Louise Tippin . . . 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Mary Barnhart . 
Kathleen Cooner 
Margaret Hearn 



Class of 1935 



. Birmingham, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 



Gaynelle Overbv . 
Helen Praytor . 
Annie Ruth Walker 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED ONE 




Top row: Blackmon. Brown, Dou 
Stcond row: Gourley, Keith, Kcr.nema 



las 

r. Park 



Pi Gammna Mm 

National Social Science Fraternity 

Founded at Southwestern University, 1924 
Founded at Howard, 1928 

Motto: "Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free. 



Fratres ix Facultate 

Louis W. Lohr W. E. Bohannon 

Richard L. Alexander James K. Greer 

James H. Hendricks 

FrATRES IX CoLLEGIO 

Wiibur Blackmon Lorimer Hendricks 

J. N. Brown, Jr. Justyne Keith 

Thomas Douglas Jake Kennemar 

Lee Gourley Carl Park 

Atkins Simmons 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWO 




Top row: Ansley, Band, Chappie 
Second row: Fitzpatrick, Hat-grave, Sisson 



Hypatia 

Founded at the University of Alabama in 1Q22 
Colors: White and Gold Flower: Yellow Rose 

Members 

Sylvia Sisson President 

Pauline Band Vice-President 

Edith Ansley Secretary and Treasurer 

Margaret Fitzpatrick Historian 

Mary Frank ChApple Monitor 

Mary Margrave 

Hypatia is a national honor socity for senior girls, 
recognizing the attainments of these girls in scholarship, 
character, personality, and their interest and activity in 
the life of the college. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THREE 




Front row: Berry, Harrison, Salter, Hargrave, Caudell, Kronenberg 

Center row: Lamb, Wells. Fitznatriek, Ansley, Windham 

Top row: Fuller, Blackmon 



Pi K.appa Theta 

Honorary Journalistic Fraternity 

Officers 

Wilbur Blackmon • • President 

Braxton Carr Vice-President 

Mary Harcrave Secretary 

Beulah Caudeli Treasurer 



Members 



Robert Ansley 
Mada Berry 
Wilbur Blackmon 
Braxton Carr 
Beulah Caudell 
Jimmie Cooper 
Margaret Fitzpatrick 
Malcolm Fuller 
Mary Hargrave 



Louise Harrison 
Elizabeth Kronenberg 
Majel Mangum 
Dewitt Matthews 
Paul O'Neal 
Loee Salter 
Wallace Ward 
J. W. Wells 
Amasa Windham 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FOUR 




First Row: "Winstead, Rowe, Fenn, Miller. Stcadham. 

Second Row: Winstead, Macnn, O'Neal Perry. 

Third Row: Gallman, Avery. Bancroft, Davis. Sims, Bryant, Brantley. 



Student Mission Band 

Officers 

Leon Macon President 

Elizabeth Fenn Vice-President 

Howard Bryant Secretary 

Sara Allred Treasurer 

Robert Perry Chorister 

Elizabeth Miller Pianist 

Oscar Davis Reporter 



Members 



Sara Allred 
Julius Avery 
Mrs. Julius Avery 
Joe Bancroft 
John Barnes 
Vernon Brantley 
Howard Bryant 
Oscar Davis 



Elizabeth Fenn 
Lee Gallman 
Leon Macon 
Elizabeth Miller 
Robert Perry 
Nathan Sims 
Elsie Steadham 
Grady Winstead 



Mrs. Grady Winstead 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIVE 





Salter, Barger 



The Eetre Nous 



Loee Salter Editor 

A. S. Barger Business Manager 



Editorial Staff 



Fred Andrews 
John Barton 
Zou Steele Bass 
Wilbur Blackmon 
Elizabeth Brown 
Beulah Caudell 
Jimmie Cooper 
Maisey Davidson 
Roy Fayet 



Margaret Fitzpatrick 
Frank Fleming 
Alvan Outland 
Margaret Padcett 
Marjorie Roper 
Henry Smith 
Leanora \ t ice 
Wallace Ward 
Amasa B. Windham 



Hi sin ess Staff 
Evie Mae Ansley Hendon Blaylock 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIX 















Top row: Andrews. Ansley, Barton, Bass 

Second row: Blackmon, Blayloek, Brown 

Third row: Caudell, Cooper, Davidson, Fayet 

Fourth row: Fitzpatrick, Fleming, Outiand, Padgett 

Filth row: Roper, Smith, Ward, Windham 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVEN 





Blackmon, Ward 



®lj? Uowarfc (EritttHim 

Published every week during the scholastic year by students of Howard College. 

The purpose of The Howard Crimson is to publish news regarding Howard 
College; to further the best interests of the students and of the institution by keeping 
alumni and friends in touch with Howard life. 

Entered as second-class matter October 6, 1920, at the postoffice at Birmingham, 
Ala., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Act of October 
3, 1917, authorized November 29, 1920. 

Subscription Rate $1.50 per College Year 

CRIMSON STAFF 

Wilbur L. Blackmon Editor 

Wallace T. Ward Business Manager 

Robert Ansley Loee Salter Emerson Gay 

Assistant Editor Assistant Business Managers 

CONTRIBUTORS 

Louise Harrison Jimmie Cooper Beulah Caudell 

Lonnell Smith Tom Ledbetter Loee Salter 

Elsie Gammill Mada Berry Majel Mangun 

Margaret Fitzpatrick Victor Levine Braxton Carr 

Elizabeth Kronenberg Louise Tippen Nina Miglionico 

FACULTY ADVISERS 

Dr. August Mason Prof. J. F. Rothermel 

Prof. L. W. Lohr 



page one hundred eight 




Top row: Andrews, Ansley, Berry, Carr, Carroll 

Second row: Caudell, Ceraso, Cooper, Fitzpatrick 

Third row: Fuller, Gammili, Gay ; Hargrave, Harrison 

Fourth row: Hood, Johnson Knight, Kronenborg, Lamb, Mangaun 

Fifth row: Mauney, Matthews. Miglionica, Price, Salter, Smith 

Sixth row: Stutts, Tippin, Turner, Upton. Wells, Windham 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINE 



Uptist Student Union 



J. O. Collev President 

Dewitt Mathews First Vice-President 

Bf.ulah Caudell Second l"tcc-l'rcsidcnt 

Paui, O'Neai Third Vice-President 

Hazel Kyle Secretary 

Campbell Napier Treasurer 

Majel MANGUM Reporter 

Ellisov Cosby Chorister 

Elizabeth Miller Pianist 

Representatives 

Sylvia Sisson President Y. W. C. A. 

Grover Williams President Y. M. C. A. 

Margarei Padgett ... . . President Y. If. A. 

Oi.iv Gay President Ministerial Association 

Ci Ayton WADDELL . General B. Y. P. U. Representative 
Virginia Sharples . Gen. Sunday School Representative 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TEN 




Top row: Cosby, Caudell, Colley, Kyle 

Second row: Mangun, Matthews 

Third row: Miller, Padgett, Miller, Napier 

Fourth row: Sisson, Waddell, AVilliams 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED ELEVEN 



Y. W. C. A. 

Officers 

Sylvia Sisson Pn 

Anna Stuart Dupuy Vice-President 

Elsie Prewitt Secretary 

Margarei Padgett . Treasurer 

Freshman Commission Director 

Mada Berry 

Social Committee Industrial Committei 

loee sai ter rozelle johnson 

Lillian Cunningham Frances Fuller 

Bulletin Board Committee Social Service Committee 

Maisey Davidson Zou Steele Bass 

Eleanor Arendale Lonneli. Smith 

World Fellowship Committee Reporters 

Bertha Williamson F*Avaa Price 

Hazel Kyi e Louub Harrison 

Interracial Committee , n , „ 

scrap Book (committee 
Majel Mancln 

„ „ Mary Elizabeth Cray 

Beulah Caudell 

Catherine Williams 

Typists 

Registrars 
Mary Hargrave 

Annie Mae Crumpton Gladys Timmons 

Pauline Wii son 

Devotional Chairman 

Marjorie Mauney Training Course Chairman 

\ t irg:\ia Sharpies Miller 

Dramatics 

Margaret Fitzpatrick R "" m Chairman 

Lee Price Goff Mary Aicee 

Pianist Chorister 

Nina Miglionica Olive Henkle 

President Freshman Commission 
Bess McComas 



ident 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWELVE 




Top row: Algee. Arendale, Bass, Berry, Caudell 

Second row: Cunningham. Davidson, Dupuy, Fitzpatrick 

Third row: Fuller, Goff, Gray, Hargrave, Harrison 

Fourth row: Henkel, Kyle, Mangun, Mauney 

Fifth row: McComas, Miglionica. Padgett. Prewitt, Price 

Sixth row: Salter, Sharpies 

Seventh row: Sisson, Smith. Timmons, Williams, Williamson 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTEEN 



Y. M. C. A. 



Officers 

Grover Williams President 

Robert Ansley Vice-President 

Lincoln Knight Secretary 

J. O. Colley Treasurer 

Curtis Williams Chorister 

Lee Gallman Pianist 

Cabinet Members 

Alfonso Barcer 
John Barton 
Howard Crane 
Emerson Gay 
Olin Gay 
Ralph Hood 
Robert King 
R. B. Peace 
Henry Smith 
Ward Upton 
Wallace Ward 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FOURTEEN 




1 



Top row: Ansley, Barger, Barton 
Second row: Colley, Crane 

Third row: Gallman, Gay, Knight 
Fourth row: Smith, Upton 
Fifth row: Ward, Williams 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTEEN 



Sigmna SigMia Kappa 

National Honorary Education Sorority 



Colors: Purple and White 



BETA CHAPTER 

Established in 1028 



Floiaer: Iris 



Officers 

Hazel Azelia Kyle President 

Zou Steele Bass Vice-President 

Sylvia Sisson Secretary 

Tera Dell Williams Treasurer 

Mary Frank Chapple Chaplain 



Members 

Zou Steele Bass 
Mary Frank Chapple 
Hazel Azelia Kyle 
Frances Mosley 
Sylvia Sisson 
Willie Slaughter 
Gladys Timmons 
Tera Dell Williams 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTEEN 



Top row: Bass, Chappie, Kyle 

Second row: Mosley, Sisson, Slaughter 

Third row: Timmons, Williams 













PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTEEN 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTEEN 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETEEN 




hi 

Top row: Blackmon, Burnes, Clark, Crane, Fleming 

Second row: Freeman, Grant. T. am berth, C. Meadows 

Third row. H. Meadows. Sweeney, Upton, Waldrond, Ward 

Men's Pan * Hellenic Council 

Officers 

Howard Crane President 

Wilbur Blackmon Vice-President 

James Burns Secretary 

E. T. Waldrond Treasurer 

Representatives 

Sigma Phi Epsilon Alpha Lambda Tau 

Wallace Ward Howard Meadows 

Ward Upton Chapman Meadows 

Chi Sigma Gamma 
John Simmons 
James Grant 

Sigma Nu Pi Kappa Alpha 

■ Wilbur Blackmon E. T. Waldrond 

Walls Lamberth Jake Freeman 

Theta Kappa Nu Pi Kappa Phi 

Ed Sweeney Frank Fleming 

Herman Clark James Burns 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY 



Pi Kappa Alpha 



& 



.!> 




:' 



Cm 




Top row: Abrams, Andrews, Barger, Blaylock 

Second row: Bradford, Crowder, Fayet, Fletcher 

Third row: Forrester. Freeman, Givens, Hicks 

Fourth row: Kirkpatrirk, Long. McGowin, Outland 

Fifth row: Phillips, T. Smith, W. Smith. Steen 

Sixth row: Underwood, "Waldrond, Wells 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO 



Pi Kappa Alpha 



Founded at University of Virginia, March I, 1868 
Colors: Garnet and Old Gold Flower: Lily of the Valley 

Publication: "Shield and Diamond" 

ALPHA PI CHAPTER 

Established in ion 



Fratres in Collegio 
Class of 1932 



A. S. Bargf.r . 
William Long 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Paul O'Dei.l . 
Walter Smith 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Hendon Blaylock 
Wood Bradford . 
Jake Freeman . 



Class of 1933 



Birmingham, Ala. 
. Springville, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Robert Givens . . 
Kirbv Kirkpatrick 
Thomas Smith . 



. Andalusia, Ala. 

. Haskell, Tex. 

Birmingham, Ala. 



Class of 1934 

William Crowder . . . Birmingham, Ala. Alvan Outland . . 

Roy Fayet Ensley, Ala. E. T. Waldrond . 

Frank Hicks Birmingham, Ala. Joe Mike Wells . 

Class of 1935 

Howard Abrams Ohatchee, Ala. Clifford McGowin 

Fred Andrews .... Birmingham, Ala. Fred Phillips . . . 

McDuff Fletcher . . . Birmingham, Ala. Gary Steen . . . 

Thomas Forrester . . . Birmingham, Ala. Price Underwood . 



Birmingham, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

. Andalusia, Ala. 



. Georgiana, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE 



LINES ABOUT 



PI KAPPA ALPHA 

Written in the manner of Rudyard Kipling in 
"To the Ladies" 



We've taken our fun where we found it, 

We've ranged and we've rogued in our times. 

We brought a new spirit to Howard, 

And we're just now in our prime. 

We bluff and we brag on our freshmen; 

What we start, we don't finish, but then 

A Pi K. A. is funny that way, 

You can learn about college from them! 

With women, we know our onions, 

Our line is the best of the lot — 

Some of 'em fall for our chatter 

And some of them do not. 

We stand in great with the faculty, 

They grant our every whim. 

A Pi K. A. is just made that way, 

You can learn about college from them! 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR 



Sigma Nu 



















V <. 




Top row: Ansley. Bentley, Berry, Blackmon 

Second row: Bondurant, Brown, Douglas 

Third row: Downs, Eubank. Field. Foster 

Fourth row: Fuller. Gourley, Hall, Harrell 

Fifth row: Kincaid, King. Lamberth, Lanham 

Sixth row: Mason, A. McKinley, G. McKinley 

Seventh row: Milford, Nai>ier, Weissinger, Windham 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-SIX 



SiMinna Nu 



Founded at Virginia Military Institute, January I, i86g 



Colors: Gold, Black and White 



Flower: White Rose 



Publication: "The Delta" 

IOTA CHAPTER 

Established in 1870 

Fratres in Facultate 
O. S. Causey W. H. Bancroft 



Robert Berry . . . 
Thomas Bondurant 



Wilbur Blackmon 
J. N. Brown . . . 
Herbert Eubank . 



Fratres in Collegio 
Class of 1932 

Birmingham, Ala. Clifford Foster Opp, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. Lee Gourley Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of 1933 

. . Opelika, Ala. Wori.ey Field ....... Ensley, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. Paul Kincaid Birmingham, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. Amasa Windham . . . Birmingham, Ala. 



Class of 1934 

Robert Ansley .... Birmingham, Ala. William Harrell . 

Melvin Bentley Bessemer, Ala. Robert L. King . 

Thomas Douglas . . . Birmingham, Ala. Walls Lamberth . 

Frank Downs ....... Ensley, Ala. Edward Mason . 

Edward H. Fuller .... Cullman, Ala. Campbell Napier . 

Class of 1935 

Robert Hall Birmingham, Ala. Algene McKinley 

Stanley Johnson Miami, Fla. Guy McKinley . 

Cyrus Lanham Selma, Ala. John Milford . 

Ira Weissinger Opelika, Ala. 



. . Thomaston, Ala. 

. . Birmingham, Ala. 

Alexander City, Ala. 

Columbus Grove, O. 

. Birmingham, Ala. 



. Birmingham, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 
. . Huntsville, Ala. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-SEVEN 



1 



LINES ABOUT 

SIGMA NU 

Written in the manner of Edgar A. Guest in 
"Plain Living" 



We're ordinary sorts of guys, 

We're not so very neat, 

We seldom wash our face and hands, 

We never wash our feet. 

Our shirts and collars 

Are never cleean — 

We never shine our shoes. 

We're the scum of the universe — 

We are the Sigma Nus! 

If by chance we wander 
From the straight and narrow path, 
And if we flunk, our morals 
As we used to flunk our math, 
We'll not be disappointed 
When we hear the funeral knell 
For we've an alumni chapter 
In the very depths of Hell! 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-EIGHT 



Pi Kappa Phi 





Top row: Almgren, Burnes, Casey 

Second row: Cowan, Fleming 

Third row: Gay. Graves 

Fourth row: Greer, Gwin 

Fifth row: Hardin. Jones, Park 

Sixth row: Phillips, Eagan 

Seventh row: Smith, Stutts, McWhirter 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY 



PI Kappa Phi 



Founded at the College of Charleston, December 10, 1904 

Colors: Gold and White Flower: Red Rose 

Publication: "The Star and Lamp" 

ALPHA ETA CHAPTER 

Established April 25, 1925 



Fratres in Collegio 
Class of 1932 



Walter Casey Cullman, Ala. Emerson; Gay Scottsboro, Ala. 

Whitmel Cobb .... Birmingham, Ala. Harold Greer Birmingham, Ala. 

Claude Phillips Vidalia, Ga. 



Class of 1933 

Edgar Almcrenj Fairfield, Ala. James Gwin Bessemer, Ala. 

James Burns Birmingham, Ala. Carl Park Birmingham, Ala. 

Frank Fleming Luverne, Ala. Howard Perdue .... Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of j 934 

Paul Gwin Summit, Ala. Manness Kirkland .... Waycross, Ga. 

Sam Jones Pine Apple, Ala. Henry Smith . . . Alexandria City, Ala. 

Class of 1935 

Thomas Cowan .... Grove Hill, Ala. Lawrence McNeil . . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Paul Cox Clanton, Ala. Thomas McWhirter . . Birmingham, Ala. 

Copeland Graves .... Blountsville, Ala. Julian Ragan Birmingham, Ala. 

John Graves Birmingham, Ala. A. B. Stutts Atalla, Ala. 

Harold Hardin ...... Summit, Ala. Leonard Vines .... Birmingham, Ala. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-ONE 



LINES ABOUT 



PI KAPPA PHI 



Written in the manner of Robert Louis Stevenson in 
"Treasure Island" 



Twenty-nine men in a great big house, 

Yo-ho-ho and a bottle of rum! 
Most of 'em rats — nary a mouse, 

Ho-ho-ho and a package of gum! 

Sororities always clamber to get 
Our parlor for their teas, and yet 

Not one red cent for us, you bet, 
To pay upon our mortgage debt! 

Twenty-nine men in a great big house, 
Yo-ho-ho and a package of seed! 

We paid till we haven't the strength of a louse, 
So-so-so, it's money we need! 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-TWO 



Theta Kappa Nu 






^ ■#)* 0m W 



\ ■ ;23H1 *"•' 



*>"f*: W'---- 







2? 0C 





A r 




i l 



♦#C# 





Top row: Bailey, Barton. Carmichael Clark 

Second row: R. Clark, Douglas, Ewing. Fenn 

Third row: Fontille, Gibson, Graves, Kennedy 

Fourth row: Kimbrough, Lykes. Moore, Ogle 

Fifth row: Page, Parks, Randolph, Rogers 

Sixth row: Sanders. Smith, Sweeney 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-FOUR 



Theta Kappa Ne 



Organized, IQIQ. Nationalized, 1924. 
Colors: Silver, Black and Crimson 

Publication: "Theta Kappa Nu News" 



Flower: White Rose 



ALABAMA ALPHA CHAPTER 

Established in 1024 



Fratres in Collegio 

Class of 1932 

John Barton Birmingham, Ala. Lorimer Hendricks 

Herman Clark Alexandria, Ala. W. S. DeLoach . 

Class of 1933 

Robert Clark Amarillo, Tex. Victor Randolph . 

Wilbur Graves .... Collinsville, Ala. Earl Rudolph . . 

Bert Kimbrough . . . Birmingham, Ala. Ernest Smith . . 

Ellis Page Birmingham, Ala. Edward Sweeney . 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Class of 1934 



Hickman Ewing 
Jeremiah Fenn . 
Ben Fontille . 
Lamar Kennedy 



. Memphis, Tenn. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
. Brundidge, Ala. 



Herbert Lykes . 
Harvey Moore . . 
Harlan Ogle . . 
Lamar Williams 



Birmingham, Ala. 

. Amarillo, Tex. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

Montgomery, Ala. 



James Alexander 
Roland Bailey . 
Thomas Everett . 



Class of 1935 

. Birmingham, Ala. Sidney Gibson . . 
. Birmingham, Ala. John Rogers . 
. . Helena, Mont. Aubry Sanders . 
James Stewart Cincinnati, O. 



. . . Ensley, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

. . Parish, Ala. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-FIVE 



LINES ABOUT 

THETA KAPPA NU 

Written in the manner of William E. Henley in 
"Invictus" 



Out of the blight that covers us, 
Black, as the pit from pole to pews, 
We thank, whatever gods may be 
That we are Theta Kappa Nus. 
In the fell clutch of circumstance, 
We have not winced nor cried aloud, 
On football field, in games of chance, 
We boast the best athletic crowd. 
It matters not who crash the gate, 
How high-priced a ticket may seem, 
We are first among those who rate— 
We are all on the football team! 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-SIX 



Sigma Phi Epsilon 





Top row: Donald, Falletta 

Second row: Hood 

Third row: Johnson, Macomber 

Fourth row: Turner 

Fifth row: Upton, Williams 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT 



Colors: Purple and Red 



Sigima Phi Epsiloe 

Found ill at University of Richmond, igoi 
Publication: "Sig Ep Journal" 

ALPHA GAMMA CHAPTER 

Established in /030 



Flower: Red Rose 



Frater in Facultate 
Augustus H. Mason 

Fratres in Collegio 

Class of 1932 

Grover Williams Montgomery, Alabama 

Lytle White Birmingham, Alabama 

Class of 1933 

Charles Donald Fairfield, Alabama 

Ward Upton Wylam, Alabama 

Class of 1934 

Joe Falletta Birmingham, Alabama 

Eugene Huffman Birmingham, Alabama 

Henry Johnson Birmingham, Alabama 

Winston White Birmingham, Alabama 

Class of 1935 

James Cowan Birmingham, Alabama 

Donald Elwell Fairfield, Alabama 

Ralph Hood Fairfield, Alabama 

Chester Macomber North Platte, Nebraska 

James Turner Pell City, Alabama 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-NINE 



LINES ABOUT 



SIGMA PHI EPS1L0N 

Written in the manner of Joyce Kilmer in 
"Trees" 



We think that we shall never see 
A frat just like old S. P. E. 
A frat who knows all the tricks 
Of elections and politics, 
A frat that looks at girls all day 
And ogle those who pass our way. 
Our frat house is in Summer lent 
To Judson girls who pay the rent. 
Our freshmen have on bosom lain 
And suffered with a bed slat pain. 
Frats are made by men like us — 
Our slogan is "In God We Trust!' 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY 



Alpha Lambda Tau 





Top row: Brown, Dinsmore 

Second row: Estes 
Third row: Gresham, Lawson 

Fourth row: C. Meadows 
Fifth row: H. Meadows, Smith 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-TWO 



Alpha Lambda Tan 



Founded at Oglethorpe University, October 8, 1016 

Colors: Gold and Black Flower: American Beauty Rose 

Publication: "The Alpha Lambda Tau Rose Leaf" 

ETA CHAPTER 

Established in 1026 



Fratres in Col leg 10 

Class of 1932 

Burleson Dinsmore Decatur, Alabama 

Louis Killiax Birmingham, Alabama 

H. H. Meadows Loundsboro, Alabama 

Class of 1933 

Alfred Brown Gordo, Alabama 

Pete Estes Cullman, Alabama 

Aubrey Gresham Tallassee, Alabama 

Chapman 1 Meadows Loundsboro, Alabama 

Class of 1 Q34 

Dewitt Dunn Tallassee, Alabama 

Thomas Lawson Bay Minett, Alabama 

Lee Smith Bay Minett, Alabama 

Class of 1935 

Horace Guttery Carbon Hill, Alabama 

Preston Langstone Birmingham, Alabama 

Clyde Wilson Fairfield, Alabama 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-THREE 



LINES ABOUT 



ALPHA LAMBDA TAU 



Written in the manner of Lewis Carroll in 
"The Walrus and the Carpenter" 



'The time has come" the Wallflower said, 
'To speak without a pause, 

Of A. L. T.'s and A. L. T.'s and Alpha Lambda Taus, 
And whether the A. L. Tea is hot, 
And whether A. L. Tease, because — 
Seven members with seven mops, 
Could mop for half a year, 
But still I think, that water to drink, 
Would not turn into beer!" 
The golfer wept a great big weep, 
And dropped an A. L. Tear. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-FOUR 



Chi Sigma Gamma 








Top row: Ceraso. Colley, Crane 

Second row: Foster, Grant, Hampton 

Third row: Kennemar. Knight. Larrimore 

Fourth row: McCown, Sizemore, Staples 

Fifth row: Stidham, "Williams, Winstead 





PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-SIX 



Chi Sigiiia Gaimmia 



Founded in igs8 



Colors: Blue, Silver and Gold 



Flower: Sweet Pea 



Fratres in Collegio 

Class of 1932 

Richard Ceraso Brooklyn, New York 

J. O. Colley Montgomery, Alabama 

YV. Howard Crane Birmingham, Alabama 

Chester Foster Hackleburg, Alabama 

James Grant Birmingham, Alabama 

W. P. Hampton Birmingham, Alabama 

Jacob Kennemar Birmingham, Alabama 

O. W. Kent Shady Grove, Alabama 

Lincoln Knight Cullman, Alabama 

Leo McCown Birmingham, Alabama 

Atkins Simmons Memphis, Tennessee 

Curtis Williams Millport, Alabama 

Class of 1933 

George Gauggel Birmingham, Alabama 

William Staples Paris, Texas 

Class of 1934 

Benard Larrimore Dickinson, Alabama 

Max Oeser Birmingham, Alabama 

Ernest Stidham Hackleburg, Alabama 

Wm. Grady Winstead Birmingham, Alabama 

(Jlass of 1935 

E. T. Sizemore Birmingham, Alabama 

Daniel Watkins Birmingham, Alabama- 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-SEVEN 



LINES ABOUT 



CHI SIGMA GAMMA 

Written in the manner of Ogden Nash in 
"Hard Lines" 



Blessings on thee, little man, 

Would you become a Chi Sigma Gam? 

Then learn to do your studies right 

By imitating Lincoln Knight. 

Grow big like Atkins Simmons, 

And learn to charm the wimmons. 

Buy a car like Dick Ceraso, 

Play basketball like Cherry Fostaso. 

Would you become a Chi Sigma Gamma? 

Blessingses on youse, little manna! 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-EIGHT 




Top row: Ansley, Caudell, Dupuy, Pitzpatrick 

Second row: Kyle, May, Padgett 

Third row: Prewitt, Sisson, Smith, Vice, Williams, Sharpies 



Officers 

Virginia Sharples Miller President 

Margaret Fitzpatrick Vice-President 

Edith Ansley Secretary 

Tera Dell Williams Treasurer 

Representatives 
Alpha Delta Pi phi Ma 

Elsie Prewitt Edith Ansley 

Doris May Margaret Padgett 

Delta Zeta Sigma Iota Chi 

Margaret Fitzpatrick Tera Dell Williams 

Anna Stuart Dupuy Leanora Vice 

Alpha Delta Theta Beta Phi Alpha 

Lucile Smith Hazel Kyle 

Beulah Caudell Sylvia Sisson 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-NINE 





Top row: Algee, Ansley. Barnhart 

Second row: Blair, Carlton 

Third row: F. Fuller, S. Fuller 

Fourth row: Gray, Martin 

Fifth row: May, Moreland. Parker 

Sixth row: Powell, Prewitt 

Seventh row: Sharpies, V. Sharpies. Walker 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY 



Colors: Blue and White 



Alpha Delta Pi 

Founded at Wesleyan College, 1851 
Publication: "Adelphian" 

KAPPA CHAPTER 

Established in 1910 



Flower: Violet 



SORORES IN COLLEGIO 

Class of 1932 



Frances Blair . 
Susie Fuller . . 



Birmingham, Ala. 
. Perrvville, Ala. 



Doris May .... 
Virginia S. Miller . 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Evie Mae Ansley 
Frances Fuller . 



Class of 1933 

. Birmingham, Ala. Mary Elizabeth Gray 
. . Perrvville, Ala. Helen Moreland . . 
Elsie Prewitt Birmingham, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Class of 1934 



Mary Algee . . 
Barbara Beatty . 



. Birmingham, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 
Jean Battle Walker 



Ruth Powell . 

June Sharples . 
. Birmingham, Ala. 



. Andalusia, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Lois Barnhart . 
Aileen Carlton 



Class of 1935 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Hardee Martin 
Eunie Parker . 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-ONE 





Top row: Ansley, Awtrey, Bridges 

Second row: Brown, Collins 

Third row: Evans, Grimmer 

Fourth row: Hargrave, Manley 

Fifth row: McComas, McEachern, Montgomery 

Sixth row: Padgett, Shepard 

Seventh row: Suddeth, Wear, Williams 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-TWO 



Phi Mu 



Founded at Wesley an College, 1852 
Colors: Rose and White Flower: Enchantress Carnation 

Publication: "The Aglaia" 

ALPHA GAMMA CHAPTER 
Established in 1924. 



sorores ix facultate 
Annie Boyett Mabel Willoughby 

sorores in collegio 

Class of 1932 

Edith Ansley Birmingham, Ala. Mary Hargrave . . . 

Virginia Evans .... Birmingham, Ala. Olivia Prescott . . . 

Class of 1933 

Evelyn Collins .... Birmingham, Ala. Eloise Montgomery . 

Ruth Manley .... Birmingham, Ala. Catherine Munselle . 

Pauline Wilson .... Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of 1934 

Frances Awtrey Steele, Ala. Edith Henderson . . 

Elizabeth Brown . . . Birmingham, Ala. Margaret Padgett . 

Beverly Shepard .... Birmingham, Ala. 

Class of 1935 

Doris Bridces Birmingham, Ala. Clara McEachern . 

Evelyn Grimmer . . . Birmingham, Ala. Evelyn Suddeth . . 
Bess McComas .... Birmingham, Ala. Frances Williams . 
Rf.ba Wear Coushatta, La. 



. Birmingham, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



. Birmingham, Ala. 
So. Pittsburg, Tenn. 



. . Louisville, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-THREE 





Top row: Bass. Carver, Cason 

Second row: Chappie, Cole. Davis. Dupuy 

Third row: Fitzpatrick, Galloway, Goss 

Fourth row: Henkel, Lanier, Mangun, Martin 

Fifth row: Mauney, Mosley, Nunnelley 

Sixth row: Saye, Strange, I. Turner, O. Turner 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-FOUR 



Colors: Rose and Green 



Founded at Miami University, 1902 
Publication: "Lamp" 

ALPHA PI CHAPTER 
Established in 1921 

SORORES IN FACULTATE 
Mrs. Ora Bohannon Thera Mae Towrey 



Floiver: Killarnev Rose 



SORORES IN COLLEGIO 

Class of 1932 



Zou Steele Bass Meridian, Miss. 

Mary Frank Chapple . Birmingham, Ala. 
Frances Mosi.ey . 



Margaret Fitzpatrick . Birmingham, Ala. 
Olive Henkle ..... Crawford, Miss. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 



Kathryn Davis . . 
Anna Stuart Dupuy 



Class of 1933 



. Birmingham, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 
Odell Turner . 



Dorothy Galloway . 
Mary Claire Ranule 
. Birmingham, Ala. 



. . Pineville, Ky. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Class of 1934 



Dorothy Cason . 
Glendolyn Cole . 



• Birmingham, Ala. 
. Birmingham, Ala. 
Marjorie Mauney 



Dorothy Lanier . 
Majel Mangun . 
. Birmingham, Ala. 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Class of 1935 



Ruth Carver . . 
Mary Louise Goss 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



Marion Strance . 
Idei.l Turner . . 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-FIVE 











Top row: Davies. Franklin, Griffith 
Second row: Guest. Johnson, Newell 
Third row: Richardson. Roper, Salter 
Fourth row: Strickland, Towry, Vice 
Fifth row: D. Williams, J. Williams, T. D. Williams 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-SIX 



Colors: Purple and Gold 



Sigina Iota CM 

Foundrd at St. James Xavier Academy, 1903 
Publication: "Parchment" 

CHI CHAPTER 

Established in 1924 



Floivcr: Violet 



SoRORES IN COLLEGIO 

Class of 1932 

Dorothy Newell Birmingham, Alabama 

Elizabeth Richardson Fort Payne, Alabama 

Loee Salter Birmingham, Alabama 

Evelyn Strickland Birmingham, Alabama 

Mildred Towry Birmingham, Alabama 

Tera Dell Williams Birmingham, Alabama 

Class of 1933 

Leila Mae Griffith Birmingham, Alabama 

Mildred Guest Fort Payne, Alabama 

Anne Will Richardson Fort Payne, Alabama 

Leanora Vice Birmingham, Alabama 

Jennie Williams Birmingham, Alabama 

Class of 1934 

Eleanor Overton Birmingham, Alabama 

Mary Burl Reedy ... Birmingham, Alabama 

Delene Williams Birmingham, Alabama 

Class of 1935 

Carolyn Browning Birmingham, Alabama 

Isabella Davies Birmingham, Alabama 

Louise Franklin Birmingham, Alabama 

Geraldine Harris Birmingham, Alabama 

Evelyn Calhoun Johnson Birmingham, Alabama 

Marjorie Roper Birmingham, Alabama 



ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-SEVEN 



^ 





Top row: Bozeman. Carlton, Cunningham 

Second row: Davidson, Detamore. Goff 

Third row: Kennedy, Kyle, Phillips 

Fourth row: Rogers. Sisson, Timmons 

Fifth row: Traweek, Williams. Wynn 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-EIGHT 



Beta Phi Alpha 



Founded at University of California, 1000 
Colors: Green and Gold Flower: Yellow Tea Rose 

Publication: "Aldebaran" 

SIGMA CHAPTER 

Established in 1928 



SORORES IN COLLEGIO 

Class of IQJ2 

Frances Farrar Birmingham, Alabama 

Julia Kennedy Brundidge, Alabama 

Hazel Kyle Birmingham, Alabama 

Sylvia Sisson Birmingham, Alabama 

Gladys Timmons Gadsden, Alabama 

Freida Traweek Birmingham, Alabama 

Class of 1933 

Lillian Cunningham Birmingham, Alabama 

Catherine Williams Birmingham, Alabama 

Annie Ruth Wynn Birmingham, Alabama 

Class of 1934 

Louise Detamore Birmingham, Alabama 

Lee Price Goff Birmingham, Alabama 

Mary Jo Phillips Birmingham, Alabama 

Nancy Posner Birmingham, Alabama 

Class of 1935 

Theo Bozeman Birmingham, Alabama 

Frances Carlton Birmingham, Alabama 

Inez Rogers Birmingham, Alabama 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-NINE 





Top row: Berry, Caudell. Cobb 

Second row: .1. Hearn, M. Hearn. Johnson 

Third row: Keith. Leatherwood. S. Slaughter 

Fourth row: W. Slaughter. Lonnell Smith, Lucile Smith 

Firth row: Stallworth, Trammell, Whitmire 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY 



Alpha Delta Theta 



Founded at Transylvania College, JQJQ 
Colors: Turquoise, Silver and Scarlet 

Publication: "The Portals" 



Flower: Sweet Pea 



PI CHAPTER 

Established in 1020 

SOROR IN FACULTATE 
French Haynes 

SORORES IN COLLEGIO 

Class of 1932 

Nona Leatherwood Holt, Alabama 

Sara Slaughter Birmingham, Alabama 

Willie Slaughter Birmingham, Alabama 

Rubv Wharton Birmingham, Alabama 

Class of 1933 

Beulah Caudell Falkville, Alabama 

Jeanne Hearn Birmingham, Alabama 

Lonnell Smith Cottonwood, Alabama 

Lucile Smith Cottonwood, Alabama 

Marion Stallworth Beatrice, Alabama 

Merle Trammell Trafford, Alabama 

Class of 1934 

Mada Berry Birmingham, Alabama 

Lauralie Bradford Birmingham, Alabama 

Class of IQ35 

Virginia Cobb Birmingham, Alabama 

Marcaret Hearn Birmingham, Alabama 

Hazel Johnson Birmingham, Alabama 

Marguerite Whitemire Birmingham, Alabama 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-ONE 




This world is full of beauty/ 



BE JK U T V 



the 



ENTRE 
NOUS 

presenk 





Jnarij C^aoe GjLonoqe 



Charm — the outstanding example of charm on 
the campus — a member of Alpha Omicron Pi 




JJoris Jjrwcjes 



Personality — This elusive quality is combined 
in her smile and manner — a member of Phi Mu 



immmmw<m?mmm7!mS 




<j~taroee ^MarL 



LYl 



Vivaciousness — a dazzling blonde with spark- 
ling brown eyes — a member of Alpha Delta Pi 




C/lecuior Uvert 



on 



Warmth — the lure of the tropics is expressed in 
her every move — a member of Sigma lota Chi 



mM*wimMmmm.s. V 




frames 1) 



nee 



Color — a brunette with magnetic attraction and 
colorful manner — a member of Chi Omega 







^Mildred (L-owri/ 



Poise — a magnificent bearing and gracious 
mien of royalty — a member of Sigma lota Chi 



/ I he 1932 beauties were selected 

V y U not hy pictures , as before y but 

in person at a reception given by 
the Staff- ^he judges were : 

^Arthur L. ^airnsfather, painter; 
James Saxon Qhilders> author; 
Srnest c 3~£enderson Jr., artist; 
Salter T^psser, photographer; 

and 
c 3ienry c \Jance ) journalist. 



Howard Lites 






i r> 



.' 



J\OOQr-'l cylry^iey 



\ T k 

1 i ! I 

jappappi- /; p ^patpicio 

^ k^ J UAIO (POPUl A/Z/i 



y) 




cji I Uvo^ 



wr> 



APOLLO 
(handsome) 




o<?epaii;er> 

DIAHA 



L?rloni ag JJor)ciupan ; c 
Cathlbt/c) 



\jQVQY>\y g)[y<?para (• 



APHRODl I i. 
FASH JON PI AT/:) 




PP- PAAZ(/0' 




9 



GODS OF 



qclvqv lad pel? 




L\oq jallelpa. (&*■) " r[pr>oeri Gu-banlo 



!,?a wind hcr^l 




13 AC C HTJ 

ah) 



Jupit&r. (popular/ ry) 



THE CAMPUS Uo 



Og^S 



P. A. has entered the football 

ranks — Z. A. Laney and Roy 

Fayet. 



Frank Stacy, the Morning after 
the River before. 



Two promising athletes struck 
by camera. 



Now that you've made an "A" 

in this course, why keep on 

studying so hard? 



The Beauties line up before the 

"battle." Now you see why 

Howard is so interesting. 



The Sigs give the birdie a break. 
(Profs., please note the books!) 



Nelwyn Huff, the Southern Edi- 
tor — and no "frame-ups," either. 



Bob, Margaret, and Mary Flor- 
ence—past, present and future 
Howardites. 



CL^O 



b 





a 



Howard students studying hard 
on a lovely spring day! 



Isn't there a mistake, Margaret? 



The futuristic method of keep- 
ing in training — the kiddy-car. 
Ask Williams. 



Mosher gets a free shave for the 
Southern game. Lucky whiskers! 



Howard's tennis team — Barton, 
Cosby, Gay, Hendricks, Moore. 



Billy Bancroft — Like Father, 
Like Son. 



The most popular class out of 

school in a lively session. Ether- 

idge the teacher — Bentley, chief 

amuser. 



The Sigma Rats off for a class 
a la basket, pillar and spectacle. 



e^O 



O 



Z) 



FAMOUS CASES AT 
HOWARD 



Holmstedt and Bell — Non- 
prossed. 

•w 

Kronenberg and Marks — Con- 
tempt of court. 

■▼• 
Slaughter and Dunn — Perjury. 

▼ 

King and Padgett — Jury still 
out. 

■w 

Bondurant and Bledsoe — Con- 
victed, life sentence. 

Ewing and Williams — Appealed 
to Supreme Court. 

Clark and Bridges — Trial pend- 
ing, new evidence. 

The Ladies' Rage — Just state a 
preference for green! 



0^ 



£CD 



b 





i 




0»n3 



The Eternal Three — Shag, 
Pooch and Eddie. 



The faculty help mourn the pass- 
ing of the Seniors. 



One of our favorites- -not Rich- 
ard L. Alexander, with the de- 
grees, but "Professor Alec." 



Wilbur Blackmon will now ren- 
der the "Crimson Blues." 



Lady Ann with her train of ad- 
mirers. 



The end of four happy, care- 
free years. Line up, get the old 
"dip," then conquer the universe 
with what you've gained. 



Carl Park, President of the Stu- 
dent Body. 

■▼■ 

E. T. Waldrond and Jake Free- 
man, the pride of Pi K. A. 



e^O 



(D 




PLN(D$) 

AND 



Put not your trust in money, 
But put your money in trust/ 



HI A ' l%l C E 






joKes 



Prof. Mason has Maxwell Bodenheimer's 
"Virtuous Girl." Slightly used— $2.00. 



An old colored man was burning dead grass 
when Paul Rosenthal, the well-informed young 
man, stopped and said: "You're foolish to do 
that, Uncle Eb; it will make the campus as 
black as you are." 

"Don't you worry 'bout dat, sah," re- 
sponded Uncle Eb. "Dat grass will grow out 
an' be as green as you is." 



Hickman: "May I kiss you?" 

(No answer) 

Hickman: "May I kiss you?" 

(No answer) 

Hickman: "I said, 'May I kiss you?' " 

(Still no answer) 

Hickman: "Say, are you deaf?" 

Tera Dell: "No, are you dumb?" 



Professor: "You're illiterate! Absolutely il- 
literate!" 

Frosh: "Oh, I am not! And here's my birth 
certificate to prove it." 




The Sigma Nu ixiho ivas struck 
by a flask of "lightning." 



Wallace Ward (the advertising man) was Prof. Bohannon: "Why are you so dumb?" 

proposing to Marjorie Mauney. "This is your Charley Hulsey: "I haven't the slightest 

last opportunity to take advantage of this as- idea." 

tonishing offer." Prof. Bo.: "Correct." 




Tke Allied Arts Club Holds a Meeting 



The scene is in Room 2 of the Main Build- 
ing. Margaret Fitzpatrick is presiding. Bob 
Ansley is speaking. Leonard Etheridge is sit- 
ting idly in the window and no one else is lis- 
tening, either. 

Bob Ansley: "Let's give a play." 
Leonard: "Fine! Who'll we give it to?" 
Louise Harrison: "What play will we give?" 
Sylvia Sisson: "Let's give 'The Earnestness 
of Being Important'." 

Leonard (to Campbell Napier) : "Great! 
You'll be Earnest and I'll be Important." 

Mada Berry: "I don't like that play — it's a 
tragedy." 

Leonard: "It's a tragedy the way we give 
it." 

Glendolyn Cole: "Let's give a one-act play." 
Leonard: "Excellent! Then the audience 
won't have so much time to throw cabbages." 

Gordon Sorrell: "What are you talking 
about? The audience won't throw cabbages." 
Leonard: "You're right! They'll throw to- 
matoes — and forget to take the cans from 
around them." 

Mary Algee: "Where'll we give the play? 
At the Little Theatre?" 

Leonard: "The littler, the better.'" 
Frances Blair: "What'll be the admission 
charge?" 



Leonard: "Two soap wrappers or ten pins." 

Eleanor Arendale: "But we've got to have a 
director. Who'll we use for a director?" 

Leonard: "Use the city directory, or the tele- 
phone directory — and if you can't find that, 
get Baird's Manual." 

Dick Ceraso: "I make a motion that any or- 
ganization that sells 75 tickets, gets ten per 
cent of the sales." 

Leonard: "Ten per cent! Shucks! Any or- 
ganization that sells 75 tickets ought to get a 
gold medal." 

Majel Mangun: "Just leave it to me. I'll 
fix everything." 

Leonard: "In that case, I resign from the 
club!" 

Braxton Carr: "Shall I handle the public- 
ity?" 

Leonard: "Yes, and handle it carefully — 
it breaks so easily." 

Helen Moreland: "What about the stage 
manager?" 

Leonard: "There you go — delving into peo- 
ple's private lives!" 

Elsie Prewitt: "Then it's all settled?" 

Leonard: "Yes. I make an adjournment 
that we motion." 

CURTAIN. 



Bill Long: "Well, well, are you in 
college for good now?" 

Frances Carlton: "No, I'm in a so- 
rority." 



Mary Elizabeth (to one-armed 
driver) : "For goodness' sake, use two 
hands!" 

Ray: "Can't! Gotta drive with 
one." 




Howard Sorrenson: "Those must be pretty fancy 
pink undies you liave on under that frock.' 

Elizabeth Brown: "Wrong again! That's sun- 
burn." 



Ode to the Faculty 

(With apologies to Joyce Kilmer) 



I think that I shall never see 

A head as bald as T. R. E., 

A prof, as full of temperament 

As Dr. M., a puzzling gent, 

A dean who insists like P. P. B., 



On coats, cravats, and civility. 
A prof, as fine as Oscar S., 
Or snappy as " Collegiate" Hess. 
Money is made by fools like me, 
And then paid over to Lottie J. T. 




Dr. "Potsy" Hendricks •will noiv sing a little 
ballad entitled, "My Spanish Cavaliero," in French. 



A. B. Stutts is only a frosh, 
With three more years to go, I guess, 
And though he does not hold a degree, 
He signs himself as A. B. S. 



Onren Walls Lamberth is not 
By any means a bird or jowl, 
And yet to see him sign his name, 
You'd swear he was an O. W. L. 



Curtis A. Douglas is very good, 
An upright Christian is he, 
But still, he's forced to go through life 
And sign himself a C. A. D. 



Burleson A. Dinsmore is very mild, 
An even tempered man is he. 
It's funny, though he's very calm, 
That Burleson is always B. A. D. 



Tuesday Night, 

7:45 O'Clock 



Hear Dean Burn's Address 



Is th 



ere a 



Hell? 



Curtis Williams v?ill sing, "I •Want to go there, 
don't you?" 




After due consideration, the Entre Nous is 
happy to announce its selection for the Campus 
Ail-American H. A. Team. To the casual ob- 
server, it would seem a hopeless task to pick 
the most deserving group from all those worthy 
of consideration, but the Humor Editor of the 
Entre Nous is fully confident that this selec- 
tion has brought together the strongest aggre- 
gation on the campus. 

Amasa "Bull' Windham Left End 

Alice "Alimony" Hewes .... Left Tackle 
Howard "Nasty" Purdue .... Left Guard 
Annis "Slime" Wynne Center 



Braxton "Brag" Carr Right Guard 

Omer "Nerts" Reed Right Tackle 

Inez "Honeybritches" Rogers . . . Right End 
Robert "White Hope" Ansley . . Quarterback 
Jimmie "H. A.' Cooper . . . Left Halfback 
Wallace "Howard College" Ward . . . 

Right Halfback 

Hardee "Gimme-Gimme" Martin . . Fullback 



The evil effect of dancing is only too evi- 
dent. George Washington was an inveterate 
dancer and became the Father of his Country. 



ree Advice From 
| The Answer Man 

5 

dOCOOCOCOQOOOOOOOCOCCOOOCCCCOOOeCOCOOOOCOQCCCCOOOOOOOOSOCOSOCCCCOOCCOSCSOSC^ 





Dear Answer Man: 

I'm in a fog, 
I'm wandering in the dark. 
I can't get Doris off my mind. 
What'Il I do? 



(Signed) Herman Clark. 



Dear Herman: 

All that I can say, 
Is take it like a man! 
And if that fails, marry the girl. 
Yours truly, 



Dear Answer Man: 

I have a hen, 
But I cannot make her lay. 
If you'll suggest a way, you will 
Oblige, 



Dorothy Galloway. 



The Answer Man. 



Dear Dorothy: 

You're in a quandary, 

But help you, I think I can. 

Just hit the hen a good hard lick, 

And she'll lay. 

The Answer Man. 



Dear Answer Man: 

Will you please tell us 
(Me and Eddie Mason) 
What's good for biting finger nails? 
Yours truly, 

Dorothy Cason. 

Dear Dorothy and Ed: 

To remedy 

Your trouble, I think I can. 

The best thing for biting finger nails 

Is sharp teeth. 

The Answer Man. 



Dear Answer Man: 
I have no power 
With girls who come my way. 

How can I make them fall for me? 
Yours truly, 



Emerson Gay. 



Dear Emerson: 

The easiest way 

To make 'em fall (and you can) , 

Is to throw banana peelings 

Under their feet. 

The Answer Man. 




HOW TO BECOME A FIRST-RATE COLUMNIST 

If you would become a second Roosevelt, Coolidge, Jim- 
mie Cooper, Professor Whoozis, Silly Susie or Com- 
mentator, just write your own joke in the above space, 
sell it and, with the money, open up a delicatessen store. 



IN APPECIATION 

vf}o our (^Advertisers, the 
Staff Itishes to acknowledge with sincere gratitude 
their help in making possible this issue of the Sntre 
Valgus. If to you, as students, this annual is repre- 
sentative of the College and of this (fftlagic Qity, 
we are asking that you co-operate with us in the 
furtherance of good will hy patronizing them, 
many of whom have grolvn with c \Koward and 
Birmingham in size and spirit. ^ Tlease call 
attention to the fact that you are a ^^Koward 
student, thereby obtaining better service for your- 
self and showing your appreciation for their 
repeated support even through such 
times of financial stress. 

KNOW OUR ADVERTISERS 



HOWARD COLLEGE 



CLASS "A" STANDARD COLLEGE 
FOR BOYS AND GIRLS 



OWNED AND CONTROLLED BY 

THE BAPTISTS OF ALABAMA 



In choosing a college the graduate of the high school nat- 
urally prefers to go to an institution that is alive and progressive. 
Howard College is growing steadily every year in numbers and 
influence. This is due to the character of the college life and 
to the splendid instruction offered in the class rooms. 



HOWARD COLLEGE PRIDES ITSELF ON BEING ONE OF THE 

BEST INSTITUTIONS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION IN 

THIS SECTION OF THE SOUTH 



For Catalogue and Other Information 
Address 



The President, Howard College 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Ride the Street Cars 



Cook With a 




Electric Range 



BIRMINGHAM ELECTRIC 
COMPANY 



Leo Loeb Co 



m 



Incorporated 



pany 



1919 THIRD AVENUE 
Over the College Slipper Shop 



Specializing 

College Girls' Sport Wear 
College Girls' Dresses 

College Girls' Coats 

College Girls' Sweaters 

College Girls' Skirts 



The kind looking differently and al- 
ways new and up-to-date. Pay us 
a visit, please. 



Compliments 

American Bakeries 
Company 

Birmingham, Alabama 



c/fletifa 



CAKES AND BREAD 



The Southside Baptist Church 

Joins the host of friends and well-wishers of Howard College in congratulat- 
ing the board, faculty, and students upon the splendid record the college is 
making and wishes for this great institution ever increasing prosperity and 
usefulness. 

All Howard College folk receive a special welcome at Southside Church. 
J. E. DILLARD, Pastor 



FRATERNITY, COLLEGE AND 
CLASS JEWELRY 



COMMENCEMENT ANNOUNCEMENTS 
AND INVITATIONS 



J eiveler to the Senior Class of 
Howard College 



I, G. BALFOUR COMPANY 

MANUFACTURING 

JEWELERS AND STATIONERS 

ATTLEBORO, MASS. 




um can 
afford 




poller 

Champion 



Compliments of the 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Birmingham 



4? 



BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



PANSY HAM 

You Can Almost 
SEE the Flavor 



Through flavor and freshness they 
have won first place on Alabama ta- 
bles. The finest hams you ever 
served! Savory! Tender! 
Good for you! 



Alabama 
Packing Company 



BIRMINGHAM 



Manufacturers of 

Jim Dandy Stock Feeds, Poul- 
try Feeds, Dairy Feeds, Meal, 
and Grits 




WESTERN GRAIN 
COMPANY 



BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



SENIOR CLASS PROPHECY 

To the tune of "When the Roll is Called Up 
Yonder," the pearly gates swung open. St. Peter 
adjusted his glasses and began turning the pages 
of his enormous, leather-bound record. He sniffed 
audibly once or twice as he reached the "A" sec- 
tion. His gnarled finger traced a course down the 
page and paused midway in its course. 

"Edith Ansley!" he called, and as she an- 
swered, "What have you done these many years?" 

"I taught school — French, to be exact — at Bril- 
liant, Alabama. It's close to Jasper," she added 
by way of explanation. 

"Yes, I suppose it is. Pauline Brand! I see by 
the record that you have achieved quite a success 
in literature. You are, I believe, the outstanding 
woman author of your time." 

"Quite right," put in Joe Bancroft, "she lives in 
Budapest, where I am head of the Baptist Mis- 
sion." 

St. Peter waved them on and they adjusted their 
wings and moved leisurely down the golden way. 

"Alfonso Barger!" the scribe continued, and as 
Al stood at attention, "You were in the banking 
business?" 

"Yes — with Barger, Barger and Barger of Rio 
de Janeiro, the world's financial center." 

"You're bragging," said St. Peter and waved 
him on. 

"I'm John Ross Barton," announced the owner 
of that name. 

"I know it," said St. Peter, "and you were the 
leading man in a Broadway production for several 
years, playing opposite Madge McCool, who 
stands beside you there." 

"You're right," said Madge, "and we were quite 
successful." 

"You mean you had a good press-agent? He's 
standing there behind you, aren't you, Burleson 
Dinsmore? Burleson was the outstanding pub- 
licity agent of his time and we're glad to have 
him. Next!" 

"I'm Zou Steele Bass." 

"Well, well, if it isn't little Zou. I under- 
stand you've been decorating interiors for the past 
several years?" 

"Yes," replied Zou, "In Paris, in London, in 
Vienna, in. . . ." 

"And now up here. Well, pass on, Zou. The 
line is long and impatient. Put your wings on and 
be on your way. Well, who are you ?" 

"Robert Cecil Berry." 

"And what have you been doing all these 
years?" 

"Well, I intended to be a great doctor." 

"Why didn't you be one?" asked St. Peter. 
(Continued on Page 195) 



SENIOR CLASS PROPHECY 

(Continued from Page iq.}.) 

"I never graduated from medical school. I went 
all my life." 

"I see. Who is this prosperous looking angel 
with you ?" 

"Tom Bondurant, formerly head banker for J. 
P. Morgan and Co. He was a wizard at finance." 

"All right. Throw your cigar away and pass 
on. Who, may I ask, are you ?" 

"Braxton B. Carr, editor, publisher and owner 
of the Birmingham Neics. This gentleman here 
is Guy Carmichael, head coach at Notre Dame, 
the most famous coach since the days of Knute 
Rockne." 

St. Peter nodded absently and waved them on. 

Dan Carroll took his place in front of the ven- 
erable recorder. 

"So you took over your uncle Earl's Vanities, 
did you?" inquired St. Peter. "Well, all right, but 
don't go organizing any musical shows up here. 
And whom have we here?" 

"The head of the Cullman County Farm Bu- 
reau." 

"What's your name?" 

"Walter Casey, sir." 

"Very well, pass on. I presume this must be 
Dick Ceraso, is it?" 

"It is. For the last forty years, I've been the 
manufacturer of the Whizz Automobile, the finest, 
best, smoothest and. . . ." 

"Yes, yes, no doubt. You're talikng too much, 
though." 

"That's what Dr. Greer used to tell me when I 
went to Howard College." 

St. Peter waved him on wearily and proceeded 
to greet Mary Frank Chappie, former head libra- 
rian of the Congressional Library. Just then, 
Herman Clark came up. 

"So you flew up, did you?" asked St. Peter. 

"Yes. Soon after I was graduated, I took up 
flying and became a full-fledged aviator," answered 
Herman. 

"Good. We'll put you in charge of our flying 
squadron. By the way, what became of J. O. 
Colley and Dorothy Craddock?" 

"J. O. became president of the Baptist World 
Movement and Dorothy finally got married to 
some man whose name started with an 'F'. I 
don't exactly recall what the name was, now." 

"Well, well. And did you keep up with How- 
ard Crane or Maisy Davidson or Leonard Eth- 
ridge or. . . .?" 

"Whoa! Not so fast. Maisy did social welfare 
work for years. Howard became a famous spe- 
cialist in his middle age. He married Olive Hen- 
kel, who was doing library work. Leonard Eth- 
ridge — believe it or not — became President of the 
United States. He was a lawyer, statesman and 
politician." 

(Continued on Page 200) 



A Place to Save- 
Always 




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FURNITURE CO. 

2108 FIRST AVE., N. 



WAITE'S 



"Excellence in Foods" 



ffl 

Phone 4-1750 

ffl 

ICE CREAM 
CATERING 



At this, the beginning of your semester, we extend 
every wish for success to the students of 

HOWARD COLLEGE 

— And with you, at the threshold of this new era, 
we join hands and hope that our Magic City will 
be blessed with the prosperity which is her rightful 

heritage. 



LoVeman, Joseph & Loeb 



STCCES 




BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



A plant is precious — it is alive — one 
of the symbols of Nature's mysteries. 

To insure its longest life, keep it from 
excessive heat or drafts. Give cool 
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By the LAW OF LIFE it will radi- 
ate cheerfulness in return for a little 
attention and care. 



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Principal! 

And a Wealth of Mental Satisfaction Through Life Insurance 

JEFFERSON STANDARD LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 

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General Agent 



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Manufactured by 

BUFFALO ROCK COMPANY 

NEHI BOTTLING COMPANY 

TRY ME BOTTLING COMPANY 

COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY 

ORANGE CRUSH BOTTLING COMPANY 

CAHABA ROCK BOTTLING COMPANY 

DR. PEPPER BOTTLING COMPANY 



SLACK FLORAL 
COMPANY 

Incorporated 

2006 Third Ave., N., Watts BIdg. 
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Phone 3-6119 



The Home of Beautiful 
Flowers 



Compliments 

INDEPENDENT 
PRODUCE CO. 

DEALERS IN 

ALL KINDS OF FRUIT 

PRODUCE, POULTRY 

AND EGGS 



2101 Morris Avenue 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 




MISS MARY HARGRAVE 



GRADUATED FROM MASSEY 
1929 

GRADUATED FROM HOWARD COLLEGE 

1932 



N 



OIV 



Secretary to Dean for trie last three years. 

For Forty-four Years "Massey" Has Trained Young 

Men and Women for Executive Positions. 

They Can Train You. 



Call 3-7278, 3-7279 



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For Information 



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SENIOR CLASS PROPHECY 

(Continued from Page 105) 

St. Peter seemed lost in thought, but finally 
waved them on. His aged eyes scanned the next 
name and record. 

"Who was this seventy-third governor of Ala- 
bama?" 

"It was I — Margaret Fitzpatrick and I brought 
my entire staff along. This is Virginia Evans, 
who was secretary of state ; this is Percy Still, who 
was attorney-general and this is Curtis Williams, 
former lieutenant-governor. How do you like 
'em?" 

"Ladies present. Oh well, you can all have jobs 
in Gabriel's judicial department. Good-bye. I 
say, mister, who are you ?" 

"You never heard of me? Didn't they tell you 
I'd be here? Well, I'm Clifford Foster, and I 
was the outstanding banker in Opp, Alabama, the 
father of thirteen children and. . . ." 

"Here's your ticket. You can work in the 
Wind Department. Next!" 

"I'm Emerson Gay, sir." 

"Well, what particular claim to fame can you 
make?" 

"I became Mayor of Scottsboro." 

"I'll bet Scottsboro didn't brag about it." 

"I'm only kidding, Emerson. Who's the lady 
with you ?" 

"That's Mrs. Gay — the former Susie Fuller, of 
the Perryville Fullers. And these are the seven 
little Gays." 

The happy family moved on and Elsie Gammill 
stood before the ancient gate-keeper. 

"Hello, Elsie. What have you done for the 
past several decades?" 

"I became director of Howard College's glee 
clubs — all seven of them — and stayed with it for 
years." 

"That's good and who else made good in mu- 
sic: 

"Well, let's see. Nona Leatherwood became 
the prima-donna of the Metropolitan Opera Com- 
pany ,* Crawford Reed took Fritz Kreisler's place 
as the world's greatest concert violinist; Paul Rcs- 
(Continued on Page 20/) 



MARSHALL, 
JORDAN & KEITH 

Incorporated 

Wholesale 

Produce, Groceries, Sea Foods, 

Poultry and Fruits 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



SENIOR CLASS PROPHECY 

(Continued from Page 200) 

enthal succeeded John Philip Sousa as director of 
the famous band ; Evelyn Strickland played the 
organ at the Roxy in New York for years and the 
Slaughter sisters, Willie and Sara, became the 
rage of Broadway in their musical act." 

"They all did well, didn't they?" 

"Yes, but what Howard was proud of were her 
religious workers. Malcolm Fuller, Herschel 
Hobbs and A. Pucciarelli became the foremost 
ministers of their time. Frances Hobbs and Frei- 
da Traweek were missionaries. J. W. Wells was 
for several years president of the Southern Baptist 
Theological Seminary. They all turned out splen- 
didly." ' 

"Fine," said St. Peter, "We can use them all." 

He waved a good-bye to Elsie and turned his 
attention to Dave Gillman, who came tap-dancing 
up the golden stairs. 

"Where did you learn that new step, Dave?" 

"Oh, that's one of many I know. I danced for 
years on Broadway, you know." 

"Indeed? Who else made good on the Great 
White Way?" 

"Well, Leo McCown replaced John Barry- 
more in the movies and Howard Meadows was 
an announcer for N. B. C. and Harry Levy took 
Rolf Armstrong's place as the foremost cover artist 
of his time. Jake Kennamer played shortstop for 
the Giants." 

"Weren't there any successes in the literary 
world?" 

"Sure, plenty of them. Haven't you heard of 
Omer Reed's poetry magazines? He started the 
first one back in 1940 and it was a success from 
the beginning. Hazel Kyle wrote five best sellers 
during her life time. Loee Salter took over the 
publication of "Vanity Fair" and increased its cir- 
culation to five million. 

"Well, that's great; but we must hurry on. 
Drop back to see me later. Good morning, lady. 
What's your name and address?" 

Virginia Sharpies Miller, Riverside Drive, New 
York." 

(Continued on Page 204) 



JOE WATKINS 
BOB WOLFORD 

ODUM CLOTHING 
COMPANY 

2023 THIRD AVENUE, NORTH 



A tlantd-Southern 
Dental College 

ATLANTA, GEORGIA 

Four-Year Course Leading to 
the D.D.S. Degree 

New College Buildings 

Modern Equipment 

Ample Clinical Facilities 

Largest Dental College in Southeast 

Dental Clinics Open the Entire 

Calendar Year 

Entrance Requirements: One Year of 
College Work 

SESSION OPENS OCTOBER 
FIRST 

For Catalogue and Information, Write 

DR. R. R. BYRNES 

Dean 



Caps, Gowns, Hoods 
Choir Robes 

FOR SALE OR 
RENT 



c ^>t?° 



PAUL A. WILLSIE 
COMPANY 



205 So. Tenth St. 
OMAHA, NEB. 



1349 East Milwaukee 
DETROIT, MICH. 



FINE LEATHER GOODS 



Hartmann and 

Wheary 

Luggage 

Mark-Cross 

Leather 

Novelties 



rosenbergers 
Birmingham Trunk Factory 



1909 SECOND AVENUE 



Established 1905 



LADIES' HAND BAGS 




One Unit $1,000,000 Grade Crossing Separation 



Patronize the State 

BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

517 North Twenty-second Street 



BIBLES OR BOOKS OF ALL KINDS 



TEXT BOOKS 



A. D. SMITH 

Hamilton and Smith 

416 North Twenty-first Street 

ALL BRANCHES OF 
INSURANCE 

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Send it to the Laundry 

KM 
» 

LAUNDRY COUPON 
SALES OFFICE 



2008 F>st Ave., N. 



Phone 3-6736 




Back of All Gulfsteel Products Stands the South's Largest Independent 
Manufacturer of Finished Steel 

GULF STATES STEEL COMPANY 

Brown-Marx Building 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Ingots 

Billets 

Slabs 

Wire Rods 

Bars 

Plates 

Angles 

Sheets 

Welding Rods 



Bright Wire 
Annealed Wire 
Galvanized Wire 
Barbed Wire 
Manufacturers' Wire 

Wire and Rods 

Straightened and Cut 



Woven Wire Fence 
Nails 

Galvanized Nails 
Cement Coated Nails 
Staples 
Bale Ties 
Fence Posts 



Hotel McLester 

Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Appreciates Your 
Patronage 



Cafe in Connection 
With the Hotel 



Canterbury Clothes 

WEAR 

MADE-TO-MEASURE 
CLOTHES 

Enjoy the Comfort, Fit and Style 

That Only Fine Tailoring Can 

Bring You — 

YET PAY NO MORE 



GOLDMAN'S 



408 NORTH TWENTIETH ST. 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

Hill Grocery 
Company 



"OG^ 



BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 




SENIOR CLASS PROPHECY 

(Continued from Page 201) 

"Well, well. So you're married?" 

"Oh, yes. For that matter, lots of people do." 

"Um-m-m. Who, for instance?" 

"Well, Tera Dell Williams for instance. After 
her successful career in the movies she married 
Grover Williams. He became famous after he 
got a patent on an ear reducer." 

"That sounds like Grover. Well, who else en- 
tered into the bonds of matrimony?" 

"Frances Mosley — five times and finally ended 
with Frank, and Julia Kennedy started to, but 
changed her mind and finally succeeded to Miss 
Stinson's place in the girls' dormitory at Howard 
College. Martin Hanners, who ran a butcher 
shop in Washington, married Dorothy Newell, 
who for several years was Dean of Women in 
Claude Phillips' University at Washington. 
Claude started it with a million dollar endowment. 
Then, of course, you know that Ruby Shell Hol- 
man got married." 

"Yes, that happened quite a while ago. By the 
way, what happened to the old bunch that used to 
frequent the Science Hall at Howard?" 

"Every one of them was successful. James 
Grant became one of the world's outstanding sur- 
geons, with his headquarters in Berlin. Doris 
May startled the world with her researches in 
chemistry, being the foremost woman chemist of 
her day. She too, however, gave up a career for 
love. Frank James got his Ph.D. degree at Co- 
lumbia and six years later became head of the 
School of Science there. And you remember the 
man who discovered perpetual motion? None 
other than W. P. Hampton, himself. He got 
seventeen million dollars for his discovery!" 

St. Peter seemed astonished but waved her on, 
then called the next person in line. 



'Who 



are you , 



"Wallace Ward, and all my neighbors said I 
was the best farmer Blount County ever had. I 
raised crops down there for thirty-five years. Fact 
is, the only competition I ever had was from Bill 
Long, who had a farm right next to mine. In- 
(Continued on Page 205) 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Lincoln Reserve Life 



INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 






SENIOR CLASS PROPHECY 

(Continued from Page 204) 

cidentally, we were the only two master farmers in 
Alabama." 

"Now, now, Wallace, you're bragging. But 
why did you give up the field of business?" 

"Because Ray Parks ran me out of competi- 
tion. Ray made millions in the radio business and 
cornered the market. Lee Gourley was another 
great general of industry. Lee took over the 
Rockefeller oil interests, you know. Gladys Tim- 
mons was another who made good in business. 
She operated a beauty salon and fashion establish- 
ment in Chicago and Elizabeth Richardson was 
her chief mannequin." 

"So much for you great business men. Well, 
did anyone go into the diplomatic field?" 

"Did they? I should say so. Lincoln Knight 
was ambassador to China and Minister Plenipo- 
tentiary to Great Britain. Mary Hargrave be- 
came Dean of the Greater Howard College, as 
successor to Dean Burns — that takes a real dip- 
lomat, you know — and Harold Greer went in for 
education also. He was principal of a school in 
North Dakota. Naomi Goodwin went in for mu- 
sic — she taught it in the Margaret Smith School 
for Girls. Margaret, herself, was owner of the 
school and manager." 

"That's very interesting, but we must hurry on. 
Come back again. Well, if it isn't my old friend, 
Sylvia Sisson !" 

"Yes, St. Peter, and how are you?" 

"Lovely, just lovely. What have you been do- 
ing these years, Sylvia?" 

"I had a studio in Greenwich Village, where I 
wrote poems and stories. It was such a pretty 
place, too. I hated to leave it." 

"Oh, that's all right, you can have another up 
here. Make everybody check their wings before 
they enter though. Good-bye." 

The aged gate-keeper slowly closed his book, re- 
moved his glasses and sauntered off down the 
golden-stoned street. 

The pearly gates drew together slowly and 
Gabriel folded up his trumpet case and went to 
bed. 



r \" 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

McKesson-Doster- 

Northington 

Incorporated 



TAYLORS CAFE 

Every Day — The Best 
of Foods 



COLLEGE STATION 




The Power Twins That Satisfy 

Tiolene 



AND 



KING OF MOTOR* FUEL 



lOOHSuperPamsylvmia MOTOR OIL 

WOFFORD OIL COMPANY 




MISS LOUISE! STAPP 

Howard student; Graduate Steno- 
graphic Department Wheeler Bus- 
iness College; With Frank E. 
Spain, Attorney. Bankers Bond 
Building. 



MRS. JAMKS J. BROWN 

(nee Iris Martin) 

524 W. 12.11x1 St.. New York City. 
Howard student; Graduate Steno- 
graphic Department. Wheeler Bus- 
iness College. 



There is a constantly increasing demand for the young woman or young man of 
poise and tact, college trained, who is competent to make appointments, arrange con- 
ferences, take minutes of meetings and relieve the busy executive of routine and con- 
fidential details. The field is uncrowded and the salary rewards are unusually at- 
tractive. We recommend our Secretarial Course for the capable young man or woman 
who is ambitious to get into the best business positions. 

In keeping with its policy of giving Wheeler students the best possible business 
training, the College maintains a well-equipped Office Practice Department with a 
trained teacher in charge, where every graduate is given an opportunity for actual 
office experience before accepting a position. 

We believe that our students are happy in their work. We know that there are no 
two students of exactly the same ability, or exactly the same capacity, and we seek 
to find in each his special talents and to develop them accordingly. We combine the 
class and personal methods of instruction. 

There is something in a Wheeler training that places a stamp of distinction upon 
its graduates. This explains the constant demand for our graduates. 

• Wheeler Students Get the Best Positions • 



\Y/l_I17 ITT 17 D BUSINESS 



1911 FIRST AVENUE — Elevator Entrance 



BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



(Eaarafa piungp 




Main Library and County Courthouse 



' r Good Clothes" 

BLACH'S 





TELEPHONE 



3-5479 



Birmingham-Baggage 
Transfer Co. 

Main Office 2526 Fifth Avenue, North 

A. M. RICE, Manager 



Van Dyke Studios- 



wish to Express Appreciation of the 
Opportunity to Serve As 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER 



FOR THE 



1932 ENTRE NOUS 

VAN DYKE STUDIOS 



22iy 2 No. Nineteenth St. 



Birmingham, Ala. 



ITS REAL 



made with real cream, cane 
sugar, and the finest of fruits, 
nuts, chocolate and other flav- 
orings. No "manufactured 
cream," adulterants, or sub- 
stitutes are ever used in 



SOUTHERN 
DAIRIES 
ICE CREAM 



Trophies for All Occasions 
Fraternity Jewelry 
Medals and Silver 

ANDY JAFFE 

Manufacturer's Agent 
612 FARLEY BUILDING 

Phone 3-7948 

Representing 

Edwards Haldeman & 
Company 

Detroit, Mich. 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 




WHY? 

(For young men only) 



Young Howard Grad: "Give me one real reason why I should listen to you talk 
to me about life insurance. One real reason only, and I'll listen." 

H. Martin Nunnelley: "Because you are just sensible enough to want to make 
sure that no matter how empty of money other men's pockets may be because of 
financial misfortune, that you'll always have enough change jingling in your pocket, 
enough bills in your billfold, enough money in your bank account, to keep you in 
comfort — mind and body. 

"As one old Howard College graduate to another, I can honestly say that life in- 
surance should be your first investment. The policy should be in 'Alabama's Own' 
Protective Life. Give me a ring at 3-9200, or call by the office at 310 Protective 
Life Building. Being still a young man myself, I know your needs and I am not the 
kind to 'high-pressure' anybody." 




POST OFFICE 



Bankhead Hotel 
A 

Friendly Hotel 



WHERE 

CLOTHES HAVE "WEARING APPEAL' 

As Well As 

"POCKETBOOK APPEAL" 

for the 

SMART COLLEGE WOMAN 

NEW WILLIAMS 

1911 Third Avenue, North 



Permanent Waves, Finger 
Waves and Marcels 

Phone 9-9216 

LANGSTON BEAUTY 
SHOP 

120 SOUTH 80TH STREET 



Al 



ways a OvPlAiiAlJ^Jc Good Show 

ORPHEUM 

R. K. 0. RITZ THEATRE 

Birmingham's Favorite Play House is Right 
Out in Front Every Day in Every Way With 
the Greatest Line-U p of Feature Attractions! 

"Ours is the Business of Making People Happy! What a 
Privilege to Be So Engaged!" 



We Cater to the 

Best People in 

Town 



It is an Honor to Have Howard 

College Students As Our 

Guests 



House of Hits- 



STRAND 



Empire Theatre 



Home of 

The Best in Talking and Singing 
Entertainment 



Presenting the 

Best Feature Pictures, News 

Reels, Comedies, and 

Short Subjects 



'The Home of Courtesy 
and Comfort" 



Third Avenue and Twentieth Street 



A Great Theatre Great Pictures 

Great Organization 



All combined to give you the best entertainment and serv- 
ice in Birmingham's theatre beautiful. The theatre with 
the Howard spirit. Make it your theatre. 




Home of Paramount Pictures 



Birmingham's Million Dollar Movie Palace 

TEMPLE THEATER 

Sixth Avenue and Nineteenth Street 

2 FEATURES 6T> 
DAILY ^ 

ALSO NEWS, COMEDIES, NOVELTIES 

TEN CENTS TILL 6 P. M. TWENTY CENTS AFTER 6 P.M. 

2650 COMFORTABLE SEATS PLENTY OF PARKING SPACE 



Compliments of 

Amertran Htft dnaunmr? (Enrnpany 

OF ALABAMA 



BOOKKEEPING CIVIL SERVICE SHORTHAND 

Alabama s Largest Business College 

Enter At Any Time Telephone 4-3306 

AN ACCREDITED BUSINESS COLLEGE 



ALVERSON 

BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 



ROBERT E. ALVERSON, President 

2021 First Avenue 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Write or Call for Catalog — Day and Night Classes 



TYPEWRITING SECRETARIAL HIGHER ACCOUNTING 



Compliments of 



BRILLIANT COAL CO. 

1812-17 Webb Crawford BuJlding 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Producers of 

Genuine BRILLIANT Coal 

(Trade Mark Reg. U. S. Patent Office) 

The South's Finest Fuel 

LUMP, EGG, NUT, STOKER— A SIZE FOR EVERY 
DOMESTIC USE 



Commercial 
Printing Company 

Lithographers 

Printers, Rulers 

Blank Book 

Makers 

Phone 3-4285 



1805-7 Second Avenue, South 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



LANEY PAINT AND 
HARDWARE CO. 

Distributors 

DeSoto 100% Pure 
Paints 



Phones 
3-5196 and 3-5197 



2020 First Avenue, North 
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 



Family Service Laundry 

3-1132 Magnolia Ave. at 22nd St. 

WE USE ONLY SOFT WATER 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Yeilding Brothers Co. 

2131 SECOND AVE., NO. 



Service Barber Shop 

5530 1st Ave. D. D. Ensley, Prop. 
Let Us Help You Look. Your Best 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

MARTIN BISCUIT CO 



National Shirt Shops 

INC. 

Nationally Known Haberdashery 
205 N. 19th ST. BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 



RED DIAMOND 
COFFEE 



Meet Your College Friends At The 

BRITLINGS 

1917 1st Ave., N. 209 N. 20th St. 



FRED S. JONES & CO., Inc. 

A 11 Kinds of Ice Cream, Cak.es and Salads 
WE DELIVER DIAL 4-1100 

1901 11th Avenue, South 



DO YOU KNOW THAT: 



Birmingham is the largest city for its age in 
the world? 

Birmingham is the largest yellow pine mar- 
ket in the world? 

Birmingham is the greatest church-going city 
in the world, more persons attending for 
the population than in any other city? 

Birmingham's annual freight car tonnage is 
greater than the South's cotton crop? 

Birmingham-made products are shipped to 
every corner of the globe? (Mosquito 
nets to Central American countries, tire 
repair kits to Palestine, steel rails and wire 
to China and the East Indies, cotton gins 
to India, Mexico, South Africa, Brazil, 
and Russia, high voltage electric switches 
and fuses to New Zealand.) 

Birmingham is the only city in the world 
with coal, iron, and limestone within a 
radius of five miles? 

Birmingham has the finest municipal golf 
links in the South? 

Birmingham public school system ranks with 
the finest in the country? 

Birmingham's library has the second largest 
distribution in the South? 

Birmingham is the county seat of the second 
largest county in the South? 

Birmingham ranks third in literary produc- 
tion in U. S.? (New York first and Chi- 
cago second.) 

Birmingham leads the world in iron pipe 
production? 

Birmingham-made ships are on every sea? 



bright pages 



i±ii 







^s 



-£ JL 



^that reflect those happy 

carefree days has been oui 
goal 




1 A A A 



COLLEICE: ANNUAL' DIVI/'ION 

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